Journal cover Journal topic
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 5.668 IF 5.668
  • IF 5-year value: 6.201 IF 5-year
    6.201
  • CiteScore value: 6.13 CiteScore
    6.13
  • SNIP value: 1.633 SNIP 1.633
  • IPP value: 5.91 IPP 5.91
  • SJR value: 2.938 SJR 2.938
  • Scimago H <br class='hide-on-tablet hide-on-mobile'>index value: 174 Scimago H
    index 174
  • h5-index value: 87 h5-index 87
Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2020-97
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2020-97
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 19 Feb 2020

Submitted as: research article | 19 Feb 2020

Review status
This preprint is currently under review for the journal ACP.

Northwestward Cropland Expansion and Growing Urea-Based Fertilizer Use Enhanced NH3 Emission Loss in the Contiguous United States

Peiyu Cao, Chaoqun Lu, Jien Zhang, and Avani Khadilkar Peiyu Cao et al.
  • Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa, USA

Abstract. The increasing demands of food and biofuel have promoted century-long cropland expansion and nitrogen (N) fertilizer enrichment in the United States. However, the role of such long-term human activities in influencing the spatiotemporal patterns of Ammonia (NH3) emission remains poorly understood. Based on an empirical model including climate, soil properties, N fertilizer management, and cropland distribution history, we have quantified monthly fertilizer-induced NH3 emission across the contiguous U.S. from 1900 to 2015. Our results show that N fertilizer-induced NH3 emission in the U.S. has increased from < 50 Gg N yr−1 before the 1960s to 640 Gg N yr−1 in 2015, for which corn and spring wheat planting is the dominant contributor. Meanwhile, urea-based fertilizers gradually grew to the largest NH3 emitter and accounted for 78 % of the total increase during 1960–2015. Geospatial analysis reveals that hotspots of NH3 emission have shifted from the central U.S. to the northwestern U.S. from 1960 to 2015. The increasing NH3 emissions in the northwestern U.S has been found to closely correlate to the elevated wet NH4+ deposition in this region over the last three decades. This study shows that April, May, and June account for the majority of NH3 emission in a year. Interestingly, the peak emission month has shifted from June to April since the 1960s. Our results imply that the northwestward corn and spring wheat expansion and growing urea-based fertilizer uses have dramatically altered the spatial pattern and temporal dynamics of NH3 emission, impacting air pollution and public health in the U.S.

Peiyu Cao et al.

Interactive discussion

Status: final response (author comments only)
Status: final response (author comments only)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
[Login for Authors/Editors] [Subscribe to comment alert] Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Peiyu Cao et al.

Data sets

Ammonia emission from agricultural synthetic nitrogen fertilizer use in the contiguous U.S. during 1900-2015: a set of gridded time-series data P. Cao, C. Lu, J. Zhang, and A. Khadilkar https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.11692038.v1

Peiyu Cao et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 244 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total Supplement BibTeX EndNote
197 43 4 244 14 2 3
  • HTML: 197
  • PDF: 43
  • XML: 4
  • Total: 244
  • Supplement: 14
  • BibTeX: 2
  • EndNote: 3
Views and downloads (calculated since 19 Feb 2020)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 19 Feb 2020)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 208 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 208 with geography defined and 0 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 

Cited

Saved

No saved metrics found.

Discussed

No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 02 Jun 2020
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
In this study, we estimate monthly ammonia emission from synthetic nitrogen fertilizer use across the contiguous U.S. from 1900 to 2015. The results indicate the important role that cropland expansion and nitrogen fertilizer enrichment played in enhancing NH3 emissions. It shows such long-term human activities have dramatically changed the spatiotemporal and seasonal patterns of NH3 emission, impacting air pollution and public health in the U.S.
In this study, we estimate monthly ammonia emission from synthetic nitrogen fertilizer use...
Citation