Journal cover Journal topic
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 5.668 IF 5.668
  • IF 5-year value: 6.201 IF 5-year
    6.201
  • CiteScore value: 6.13 CiteScore
    6.13
  • SNIP value: 1.633 SNIP 1.633
  • IPP value: 5.91 IPP 5.91
  • SJR value: 2.938 SJR 2.938
  • Scimago H <br class='hide-on-tablet hide-on-mobile'>index value: 174 Scimago H
    index 174
  • h5-index value: 87 h5-index 87
Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2020-71
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2020-71
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 05 Feb 2020

Submitted as: research article | 05 Feb 2020

Review status
This preprint is currently under review for the journal ACP.

Combining atmospheric and snow layer radiative transfer models to assess the solar radiative effects of black carbon in the Arctic

Tobias Donth1, Evelyn Jäkel1, André Ehrlich1, Bernd Heinold2, Jacob Schacht2, Andreas Herber3, Marco Zanatta3, and Manfred Wendisch1 Tobias Donth et al.
  • 1Leipzig Institute for Meteorology (LIM), University of Leipzig, Germany
  • 2Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research, (TROPOS), Leipzig, Germany
  • 3Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI), Bremerhaven, Germany

Abstract. Solar radiative effects (cooling or warming) of black carbon (BC) particles suspended in the Arctic atmosphere and surface snow layer were explored by radiative transfer simulations on the basis of BC mass concentrations measured in pristine early summer and polluted early spring conditions under cloudless and cloudy conditions. To account for the radiative interactions between the black carbon containing snow surface layer and the atmosphere, a snow layer and an atmospheric radiative transfer model were coupled iteratively. For pristine summer conditions (no atmospheric BC) and a representative BC particle mass concentration of 5 ng g−1 in the surface snow layer, a positive solar radiative effect of +0.2 W m−2 was calculated for the surface radiative budget. Contrarily, a higher load of atmospheric BC representing springtime conditions, results in a slightly negative radiative effect of about −0.05 W m−2, even when the same BC mass concentration is suspended in the surface snow layer. This counteracting of atmospheric BC and BC suspended in the snow layer strongly depends on the snow optical properties determined by the snow specific surface area. However, it was found, that the atmospheric heating rate by water vapor or clouds is one to two orders of magnitude larger than that by atmospheric BC. Similarly, the total heating rate (6 K day−1) within a snow pack due to absorption by the ice water, was found to be more than one order of magnitude larger than the heating rate of suspended BC (0.2 K day−1). The role of clouds in the estimation of the combined direct radiative BC effect (BC in snow and in atmosphere) was analyzed for the pristine early summer and the polluted early spring BC conditions. Both, the cooling effect by atmospheric BC, as well as the warming effect by BC suspended in snow are reduced in the presence of clouds.

Tobias Donth et al.

Interactive discussion

Status: final response (author comments only)
Status: final response (author comments only)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
[Login for Authors/Editors] [Subscribe to comment alert] Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Tobias Donth et al.

Data sets

Aircraft measurements of refractory black carbon in the Arctic during the ACLOUD campaign 2017 M. Zanatta and A. Herber https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.899937

Tobias Donth et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 235 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
178 54 3 235 4 3
  • HTML: 178
  • PDF: 54
  • XML: 3
  • Total: 235
  • BibTeX: 4
  • EndNote: 3
Views and downloads (calculated since 05 Feb 2020)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 05 Feb 2020)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 160 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 160 with geography defined and 0 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 

Cited

Saved

No saved metrics found.

Discussed

No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 02 Jun 2020
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
Solar radiative effects of Arctic black carbon (BC) particles (suspended in the atmosphere and in the surface snow pack) were quantified under cloudless and cloudy conditions. An atmospheric and a snow radiative transfer model were coupled to account for radiative interactions between both compartments. It was found that (i) the warming effect of BC in the snowpack overcompensates the atmospheric BC cooling effect, and (ii) clouds tend to reduce the atmospheric BC cooling and snow BC warming.
Solar radiative effects of Arctic black carbon (BC) particles (suspended in the atmosphere and...
Citation