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https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2020-505
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2020-505
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 23 Jun 2020

Submitted as: research article | 23 Jun 2020

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This preprint is currently under review for the journal ACP.

Roles of Climate Variability on the Rapid Increase of Winter Haze Pollution in North China after 2010

Yijia Zhang1, Zhicong Yin1,2,3, and Huijun Wang1,2,3 Yijia Zhang et al.
  • 1Key Laboratory of Meteorological Disaster, Ministry of Education/Joint International Research Laboratory of Climate and Environment Change (ILCEC)/Collaborative Innovation Centre on Forecast and Evaluation of Meteorological Disasters (CIC-FEMD), Nanjing University of Information Science & Technology, Nanjing 210044, China
  • 2Southern Marine Science and Engineering Guangdong Laboratory (Zhuhai), Zhuhai, China
  • 3Nansen-Zhu International Research Centre, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China

Abstract. North China experiences severe haze pollution in early winter, resulting in many premature deaths and considerable economic losses. The number of haze days in early winter in North China (HDNC) increased rapidly after 2010 but declined slowly before 2010, reflecting a trend reversal. Global warming and emissions were two fundamental drivers of the long-term increasing trend of haze, but no studies have focused on this trend reversal. The autumn SST in the Pacific and Atlantic, Eurasian snow cover and central Siberian soil moisture, which exhibited completely opposite trends before and after 2010, were proven to stimulate identical trends of meteorological conditions related to haze pollution in North China. Numerical experiments with a fixed emission level confirmed the physical relationships between the climate drivers and HDNC during both decreasing and increasing periods. These external drivers induced a larger decreasing trend of HDNC than the observations, and combined with the persistently increasing trend of anthropogenic emissions, resulted in a realistic slowly decreasing trend. However, after 2010, the increasing trends driven by these climate divers and human emissions jointly led to a rapid increase in HDNC.

Yijia Zhang et al.

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Short summary
Haze events in early winter in North China exhibited rapid growth after 2010, which was completely different from the slow decline observed before 2010. However, global warming and anthropogenic emissions could not explain this trend reversal well, which still puzzled everyone. Our study found that four climate factors, exhibiting completely opposite trends before and after 2010, effectively drove the trend reversal of the haze pollution in North China.
Haze events in early winter in North China exhibited rapid growth after 2010, which was...
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