Journal cover Journal topic
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 5.668 IF 5.668
  • IF 5-year value: 6.201 IF 5-year
    6.201
  • CiteScore value: 6.13 CiteScore
    6.13
  • SNIP value: 1.633 SNIP 1.633
  • IPP value: 5.91 IPP 5.91
  • SJR value: 2.938 SJR 2.938
  • Scimago H <br class='hide-on-tablet hide-on-mobile'>index value: 174 Scimago H
    index 174
  • h5-index value: 87 h5-index 87
Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2020-276
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2020-276
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 08 Apr 2020

Submitted as: research article | 08 Apr 2020

Review status
This preprint is currently under review for the journal ACP.

Temporal Evolution of the Bromine Alpha Factor and Equivalent Effective Stratospheric Chlorine in Future Climate Scenarios

J. Eric Klobas1, Debra K. Weisenstein1, Ross J. Salawitch2, and David M. Wilmouth1 J. Eric Klobas et al.
  • 1Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge MA, USA
  • 2Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, USA

Abstract. Future trajectories of the stratospheric trace gas background will alter the rates of bromine- and chlorine-mediated catalytic ozone destruction via changes in the partitioning of inorganic halogen reservoirs and the underlying temperature structure of the stratosphere. The current formulation of the bromine alpha factor, the ozone-destroying power of stratospheric bromine atoms relative to stratospheric chlorine atoms, is invariant with climate state. Here, we refactor the bromine alpha factor, introducing climate normalization to a benchmark climate state, and reformulate Equivalent Effective Stratospheric Chlorine (EESC) to reflect changes in the rates of both chlorine- and bromine-mediated ozone loss catalysis with time. We show that the ozone-processing power of the extrapolar stratosphere is significantly perturbed by future climate assumptions. Furthermore, we show that our EESC-based estimate of the extrapolar ozone-recovery date is in closer agreement with extrapolar ozone recovery dates predicted using more sophisticated 3-D chemistry-climate models than prior formulations of EESC that employ climate-invariant values of the bromine alpha factor.

J. Eric Klobas et al.

Interactive discussion

Status: open (until 03 Jun 2020)
Status: open (until 03 Jun 2020)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
[Subscribe to comment alert] Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

J. Eric Klobas et al.

J. Eric Klobas et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 156 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
127 27 2 156 1 1
  • HTML: 127
  • PDF: 27
  • XML: 2
  • Total: 156
  • BibTeX: 1
  • EndNote: 1
Views and downloads (calculated since 08 Apr 2020)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 08 Apr 2020)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 130 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 129 with geography defined and 1 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 

Cited

Saved

No saved metrics found.

Discussed

No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 26 May 2020
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
The rates of important ozone-destroying chemical reactions in the stratosphere are likely to change in the future. We employ a computer model to evaluate how the rates of ozone destruction by chlorine and bromine may evolve in four climate change scenarios. We then show how these changing rates will impact a metric of the ozone-depleting power of the stratosphere known as Equivalent Effective Stratospheric Chlorine (EESC) and how projections of the date of ozone recovery using EESC are modified.
The rates of important ozone-destroying chemical reactions in the stratosphere are likely to...
Citation