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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2019-886
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2019-886
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 21 Oct 2019

Submitted as: research article | 21 Oct 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).

Impact of hygroscopic CCN and turbulence on cloud droplet growth: A parcel-DNS approach

Sisi Chen1,2, Lulin Xue1, and Man-Kong Yau2 Sisi Chen et al.
  • 1National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado, USA
  • 2McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada

Abstract. This paper investigates the relative importance of turbulence, hygroscopicity of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), and aerosol loading on early cloud development. A parcel-DNS hybrid approach is developed to seamlessly simulate the evolution of cloud droplets in warm clouds. The results show that turbulence and CCN hygroscopicity have a dominant effect on the formation of large droplets. When CCN hygroscopicity is considered, condensational growth has a strong effect in the first minute, providing sufficient collector droplets. In the meantime, turbulence effectively accelerates the collisions among the collector droplets and the small droplets and continues to broaden the droplet size distribution (DSD). In contrast, seeding of extra aerosols modulates the growth of small droplets by inhibiting condensational growth while the growth of large droplets remains unaffected, resulting in a similar tail of the DSD. Overall, seeding reduces the LWC and effective radius but increases the relative dispersion. This opposing trend of the bulk properties suggests that the traditional Kessler-type or Sundqvist-type autoconversion parameterizations which mainly depend on the LWC or mean radius might not represent the drizzle formation process well. Properties related to the width or the shape of the DSD are also needed, suggesting that the Berry-and-Reinhardt scheme is conceptually better.

Sisi Chen et al.
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Data support for "Impact of hygroscopic CCN and turbulence on cloud droplet growth: A parcel-DNS approach" S. Chen, L. Xue, and M. K. Yau https://doi.org/10.7910/DVN/HBIKKV

Sisi Chen et al.
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Short summary
A novel approach is used to study cloud-aerosol-turbulence interactions in early cloud development. A parcel model and a direct numerical simulation are combined to seamlessly model the evolution of a rising air parcel. Aerosol activation, droplet condensation and collision, and droplet-turbulence interactions are accurately resolved. Compared to pure water droplets, aerosol-embedded droplets quickly form large particles and initiate efficient collisional growth with the help of turbulence.
A novel approach is used to study cloud-aerosol-turbulence interactions in early cloud...
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