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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2019-878
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2019-878
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 17 Dec 2019

Submitted as: research article | 17 Dec 2019

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This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).

Molecular and spatial distributions of dicarboxylic acids, oxocarboxylic acids and α-dicarbonyls in marine aerosols over the South China Sea to East Indian Ocean

Jing Yang1,2, Wanyu Zhao2,4, Lianfang Wei2, Qiang Zhang1, Yue Zhao1, Wei Hu1, Libin Wu1, Xiaodong Li1, Chandra Mouli Pavuluri1, Xiaole Pan2, Yele Sun2, Zifa Wang2, Cong-Qiang Liu1, Kimitaka Kawamura3, and Pingqing Fu1 Jing Yang et al.
  • 1Institute of Surface-Earth System Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072, China
  • 2State Key Laboratory of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Physics and Atmospheric Chemistry, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029, China
  • 3Chubu Institute for Advanced Studies, Chubu University, Kasugai 487-8501, Japan
  • 4College of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100049, China

Abstract. Marine aerosol samples collected from the South China Sea (SCS) to East Indian Ocean (EIO) during a cruise from March 10 to April 26, 2015 were studied for diacids and related compounds. In view of the air mass backward trajectories and source regions of geographical features, the cruise area is segregated into the South China Sea (SCS), the East Indian Ocean off the coast of western Indonesia (EIO-WI), the EIO off the coast of Sri Lanka (EIO-SL), Malacca and Sri Lanka docking point (SLDP). Total concentrations of diacids, oxoacids and α-dicarbonyls were much higher at SLDP followed by the SCS, Malacca, and the lowest at the EIO-WI. In this study, oxalic acid (C2) is the dominant diacid during the cruise, followed by malonic acid (C3) in the SCS, EIO-WI, EIO-SL and Malacca, whereas succinic acid (C4) diacid was relatively more abundant than C3 diacid in SLDP. Except for SLDP, C3/C4 mass ratios were always greater than 1, and no significant difference was observed among the cruise. The C2/C4 and C2/total diacids ratios also showed the similar trends. Average mass ratios of adipic acid (C6) to azelaic acid (C9) were less than unity except for at EIO-WI; the mass ratios of phthalic acid (Ph) to azelaic acid (C9) were less than 2 except for at SCS. The concentrations of diacids were higher when the air masses originated from the terrestrial regions than those from the remote oceanic regions. Based on the molecular distributions of organic acids, the mass ratios and linear correlations of selected compounds in each area, we found that the oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) released from the ocean surface and subsequent photochemical oxidations were the main contributors to diacids, oxocarboxylic acids and α-dicarbonyls over the SCS to EIO. In addition, the continental outflow that enriched with the anthropogenic VOCs and their aging influenced the organic aerosol loading, particularly over the SCS. The emissions from local terrestrial vegetations as well as fossil fuel combustion and subsequent in-situ photochemical oxidation also played a prominent role in controlling the organic aerosols loading and molecular distributions of diacids and related compounds at SLDP.

Jing Yang et al.
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Short summary
Our observation, for the first time, provides detailed information on the atmospheric abundance and spatial distribution of dicarboxylic acids, oxoacids and α-dicarbonyls in marine aerosols collected from the South China Sea to East Indian Ocean. Our results demonstrate that the continental outflow of both biogenic and anthropogenic precursors followed by photochemical aging is one of the main sources and formation processes of marine organic aerosols over the tropical oceanic regions.
Our observation, for the first time, provides detailed information on the atmospheric abundance...
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