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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2019-790
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2019-790
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 07 Oct 2019

Submitted as: research article | 07 Oct 2019

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This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).

Ceilometers as planetary boundary layer detectors and a corrective tool for ECMWF and COSMO NWP models

Leenes Uzan1,2, Smadar Egert1, Pavel Khain2, Yoav Levi2, Elyakom Vladislavsky2, and Pinhas Alpert1 Leenes Uzan et al.
  • 1Department of Geosciences, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel-Aviv University, Tel Aviv, 6997801, Israel
  • 2The Israeli Meteorological Service, Beit Dagan, Israel

Abstract. The growing importance of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) height detection is apparent in various fields, from air pollution analysis to weather prediction. In recent years micro-lidars such as ceilometers have been recognized as an efficient tool for such measurements. Here, the daytime summer PBL height is measured by eight ceilometers throughout Israel, along with with radiosonde profiles, the global IFS model, and the regional COSMO model. The analysis focused on three PBL height evaluation methods: the bulk Richardson method, the parcel method, and the wavelet covariance transform method. The best agreement between the PBL heights derived from a single radiosonde site on 33 summer days was found by the adjacent ceilometer (mean error = 12 m, RMSE = 97 m). Spatial analysis of the PBL heights derived from the models on 13 days in reference to five ceilometer measurement sites revealed COSMO evaluations by the bulk Richardson method (COSMOR) produced the best results for both flat (mean error = 19 m, RMSE = 203 m) and elevated terrain (mean error = −6 m, RMSE = 251 m). To improve COSMOR results, a regression tool was assimilated based on the PBL height difference between COSMOR and ceilometers. The regression is based on the altitude and distance from the shoreline for eight ceilometer sites.

Leenes Uzan et al.
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Short summary
Detection of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) height is crucial to various fields, from air pollution assessment to weather prediction. We examined the diurnal summer PBL height by eight ceilometers in Israel, radiosonde profiles, the global IFS, and regional COSMO models. Our analysis utilized the bulk Richardson number method, the parcel method, and the wavelet covariance transform method. A novel correction tool to improve model results against in-situ ceilometer measurements is introduced.
Detection of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) height is crucial to various fields, from air...
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