Journal cover Journal topic
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 5.668 IF 5.668
  • IF 5-year value: 6.201 IF 5-year
    6.201
  • CiteScore value: 6.13 CiteScore
    6.13
  • SNIP value: 1.633 SNIP 1.633
  • IPP value: 5.91 IPP 5.91
  • SJR value: 2.938 SJR 2.938
  • Scimago H <br class='hide-on-tablet hide-on-mobile'>index value: 174 Scimago H
    index 174
  • h5-index value: 87 h5-index 87
Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2019-749
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2019-749
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 06 Sep 2019

Submitted as: research article | 06 Sep 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).

The Structure of Turbulence and mixed-phase Cloud Microphysics in a Highly Supercooled Altocumulus Cloud

Paul A. Barrett1,2, Alan Blyth2, Philip R. A. Brown1, and Steven J. Abel1 Paul A. Barrett et al.
  • 1Met Office, Fitzroy Road, Exeter, EX1 3PB
  • 2National Centre for Atmospheric Science, University of Leeds

Abstract. Observations of vertically resolved turbulence and cloud microphysics in a mixed-phase altocumulus cloud are presented using in situ measurements from an instrumented aircraft. The turbulence spectrum is observed to have an increasingly negative skewness with distance below cloud top, confirming that longwave radiative cooling from the liquid layer cloud is the source of turbulence kinetic energy. Turbulence data are presented from both the liquid cloud layer and ice virga below. Vertical profiles of both bulk and microphysical liquid and ice cloud properties indicate that ice is produced within the liquid cloud layer at a temperature of −30 °C. These high resolution in situ measurements support previous remotely-sensed observations from both ground based and space borne instruments, and could be used to evaluate numerical model simulations of altocumulus clouds at all scales from eddy resolving to climate.

Paul A. Barrett et al.
Interactive discussion
Status: open (until 01 Nov 2019)
Status: open (until 01 Nov 2019)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
[Subscribe to comment alert] Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Paul A. Barrett et al.
Paul A. Barrett et al.
Viewed  
Total article views: 188 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
131 55 2 188 0 0
  • HTML: 131
  • PDF: 55
  • XML: 2
  • Total: 188
  • BibTeX: 0
  • EndNote: 0
Views and downloads (calculated since 06 Sep 2019)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 06 Sep 2019)
Viewed (geographical distribution)  
Total article views: 180 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 176 with geography defined and 4 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Cited  
Saved  
No saved metrics found.
Discussed  
No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 17 Sep 2019
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
Here we present new in situ observations from altocumulus clouds made with a research aircraft. By carefully measuring the cloud top height we are able to study the turbulence and cloud properties in high vertical resolution, something not presented before. The clouds contain both ice particles and liquid drops, even though the temperature is -30 degree Celcius. These measurements will hopefully assist future developers of climate models to verify and assess the performance of simulations.
Here we present new in situ observations from altocumulus clouds made with a research aircraft....
Citation