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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2019-719
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2019-719
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 26 Aug 2019

Submitted as: research article | 26 Aug 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).

Air Quality and Climate Change, Topic 3 of the Model Inter-Comparison Study for Asia Phase III (MICS-Asia III), Part II: aerosol radiative effects and aerosol feedbacks

Meng Gao1, Zhiwei Han2,3, Zhining Tao4,5, Jiawei Li2,3, Jeong-Eon Kang6, Kan Huang7, Xinyi Dong8, Bingliang Zhuang9, Shu Li9, Baozhu Ge10, Qizhong Wu11, Hyo-Jung Lee6, Cheol-Hee Kim6, Joshua S. Fu8, Tijian Wang9, Mian Chin5, Meng Li12, Jung-Hun Woo13, Qiang Zhang14, Yafang Cheng12, Zifa Wang4,10, and Gregory R. Carmichael15 Meng Gao et al.
  • 1Department of Geography, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong SAR, China
  • 2Key Laboratory of Regional Climate-Environment for Temperate East Asia, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
  • 3University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China
  • 4Universities Space Research Association, Columbia, MD, USA
  • 5NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, USA
  • 6Department of Atmospheric Sciences, Pusan National University, Busan, South Korea
  • 7Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai, China
  • 8Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA
  • 9School of Atmospheric Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing, China
  • 10State Key Laboratory of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Physics and Atmospheric Chemistry, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
  • 11College of Global Change and Earth System Science, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China
  • 12Multiphase Chemistry Department, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Mainz, Germany
  • 13Department of Advanced Technology Fusion, Konkuk University, Seoul, South Korea
  • 14Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for Earth System Modeling, Center for Earth System Science, Tsinghua 15 University, Beijing, China
  • 15Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA

Abstract. Topic 3 of the Model Inter-Comparison Study for Asia (MICS-Asia) Phase III examines how online coupled air quality models perform in simulating high aerosol pollution in the North China Plain region during wintertime haze events and evaluates the importance of aerosol radiative and microphysical feedbacks. This paper discusses the estimates of aerosol radiative forcing, aerosol feedbacks, and possible causes for the differences among the models. Over the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei (BTH) region, the ensemble mean of aerosol direct radiative forcing (ADRF) at the top of atmosphere, inside the atmosphere and at the surface are −1.9, 8.4 and −10.3 W/m2, respectively. Subdivisions of direct and indirect aerosol radiative forcing confirm the dominant roles of direct forcing. During severe haze days (January 17–19, 2010), the averaged reduction in near surface temperature for the BTH region can reach 0.3–3.0 ºC. The responses of wind speeds at 10 m (WS10) inferred from different models show consistent declines in eastern China. For the BTH region, aerosol-radiation feedback induced changes in PM2.5 range from 6.0 to 8.8 µg/m3 (< 6.6 %). Sensitivity simulations indicate the most sensitive parameter for aerosol radiative forcing and feedback is the aerosol mixing state, and BC exhibits large contribution to atmospheric heating although it accounts for a small share of mass concentration of PM2.5.

Meng Gao et al.
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Short summary
Topic 3 of the Model Inter-Comparison Study for Asia (MICS-Asia) Phase III examines how online coupled air quality models perform in simulating high aerosol pollution in the North China Plain region during wintertime haze events and evaluates the importance of aerosol radiative and microphysical feedbacks. This paper discusses the estimates of aerosol radiative forcing, aerosol feedbacks, and possible causes for the differences among the models.
Topic 3 of the Model Inter-Comparison Study for Asia (MICS-Asia) Phase III examines how online...
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