Journal cover Journal topic
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 5.668 IF 5.668
  • IF 5-year value: 6.201 IF 5-year
    6.201
  • CiteScore value: 6.13 CiteScore
    6.13
  • SNIP value: 1.633 SNIP 1.633
  • IPP value: 5.91 IPP 5.91
  • SJR value: 2.938 SJR 2.938
  • Scimago H <br class='hide-on-tablet hide-on-mobile'>index value: 174 Scimago H
    index 174
  • h5-index value: 87 h5-index 87
Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2019-545
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2019-545
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 13 Aug 2019

Submitted as: research article | 13 Aug 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).

Comparison of south Atlantic aerosol direct radiative effect overclouds from SCIAMACHY, POLDER and OMI/MODIS

Martin de Graaf1, Ruben Schulte2, Fanny Peers3, Fabien Waquet4, L. Gijsbert Tilstra1, and Piet Stammes1 Martin de Graaf et al.
  • 1Satellite Observations Department, Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI), De Bilt, The Netherlands
  • 2Geosciences & Remote Sensing Department, Delft University of Technology (TUD), Delft, The Netherlands
  • 3University of Exeter, Exeter, United Kingdom
  • 4Université des Sciences et Technologies de Lille 1, Lille, France

Abstract. The Direct Radiative Effect (DRE) of aerosols above clouds has been found to be significant over the south-east Atlantic Ocean during the African biomass burning season due to elevated smoke layers absorbing radiation above the cloud deck. So far, global climate models have been unsuccessful in reproducing the high DRE values measured by various satellite instruments. Meanwhile, the radiative effects by aerosols have been identified as the largest source of uncertainty in global climate models. In this paper, three independent satellite datasets of DRE during the biomass burning season in 2006 are compared to constrain the south-east Atlantic radiation budget. The DRE of aerosols above clouds is derived from the spectrometer SCIAMACHY, the polarimeter POLDER, and from collocated measurements by the spectrometer OMI and imager MODIS. All three confirm the high DRE values during the biomass season, underlining the relevance of local aerosol effects. Differences between the instruments can be attributed mainly to sampling issues. When these are accounted for, the remaining differences can be completely explained by the higher cloud optical thickness derived from POLDER compared to the other instruments. Additionally, a neglect of AOT at SWIR wavelengths in the method used for SCIAMACHY and OMI/MODIS accounts for 26 % of the difference between POLDER and OMI/MODIS DRE.

Martin de Graaf et al.
Interactive discussion
Status: open (until 08 Oct 2019)
Status: open (until 08 Oct 2019)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
[Subscribe to comment alert] Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Martin de Graaf et al.
Martin de Graaf et al.
Viewed  
Total article views: 118 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
86 31 1 118 0 0
  • HTML: 86
  • PDF: 31
  • XML: 1
  • Total: 118
  • BibTeX: 0
  • EndNote: 0
Views and downloads (calculated since 13 Aug 2019)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 13 Aug 2019)
Viewed (geographical distribution)  
Total article views: 56 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 56 with geography defined and 0 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Cited  
Saved  
No saved metrics found.
Discussed  
No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 18 Aug 2019
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
The radiative effect from smoke by wildfires has been found to be much stronger than models predict. The effect is complex, smoke generally cools the climate system by reflecting sun light, but strongly warms the system when it is found over a bright cloud deck. In this paper three different satellite datasets are compared that all three confirm the strong warming of African smoke over the cloud deck in the southeast Atlantic. The intercomparison reduces the uncertainties in the observations.
The radiative effect from smoke by wildfires has been found to be much stronger than models...
Citation