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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2019-538
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2019-538
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 31 Jul 2019

Submitted as: research article | 31 Jul 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).

A model-based analysis of foliar NOx deposition

Erin R. Delaria1 and Ronald C. Cohen1,2 Erin R. Delaria and Ronald C. Cohen
  • 1Department of Chemistry, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, USA
  • 2Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, USA

Abstract. Foliar deposition of NO2 removes a large fraction of the global soil-emitted NOx. Understanding the mechanisms of NOx foliar loss is important for constraining surface ozone, NOx mixing ratios, and assessing the impacts of nitrogen inputs to ecosystems. We have constructed a 1D multi-box model with representations of chemistry and vertical transport to evaluate the impact of leaf-level processes on canopy-scale concentrations, lifetimes, and canopy fluxes of NOx. Our model is able to closely replicate canopy fluxes and above-canopy NOx daytime mixing ratios observed during two field campaigns, one in a western Sierra Nevada pine forest (BEARPEX-2009) and the other a northern Michigan mixed hardwood forest (UMBS-2012). Our model demonstrates that NO2 deposition can provide a mechanistic explanation for canopy reduction factors (CRFs). We show that foliar deposition can explain observations suggesting as much as ~ 60 % of soil-emitted NOx is removed within forest canopies. Stomatal conductances greater than 0.1 cm s−1 result in modelled canopy reduction factors in the range of those used in global models, reconciling inferences of canopy NOx reduction with leaf-level deposition processes. We also show that incorporating parameterizations for vapor pressure deficit and soil water potential has a substantial impact on predicted NO2 deposition, with the percent of soil NOx removed within one canopy increasing by ~ 15 % in wet conditions compared to dry conditions. NO2 foliar deposition was found to have a significant impact on ozone and nitrogen budgets under both high and low NOx conditions.

Erin R. Delaria and Ronald C. Cohen
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Status: final response (author comments only)
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Erin R. Delaria and Ronald C. Cohen
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Latest update: 14 Oct 2019
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Short summary
Uptake of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) through pores in the surfaces of leaves has been identified as a significant, but inadequately understood, loss process of atmospheric nitrogen oxides. We have constructed a simple model for examining the impact of NO2 foliar uptake on the atmospheric chemistry of nitrogen oxides. We show that an accurate representation in atmospheric models of the effects of weather and soil conditions on leaf NO2 uptake may be important for accurately predicting NO2 deposition.
Uptake of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) through pores in the surfaces of leaves has been identified as...
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