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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2019-524
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2019-524
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 19 Jun 2019

Research article | 19 Jun 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).

Examination of effects of aerosols on a pyroCb and their dependence on fire intensity and aerosol perturbation using a cloud-system resolving model

Seoung Soo Lee1, George Kablick III2,3, and Zhanqing Li2 Seoung Soo Lee et al.
  • 1Research Foundation, San Jose State University, San Jose, California, USA
  • 2Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, USA
  • 3US Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC, USA

Abstract. This study investigates how a pyrocumulonimbus (pyroCb) event influences water vapor concentrations and cirrus cloud properties near the tropopause, specifically focusing on how fire-produced aerosols affect this role via a modeling framework. Results from a case study show that when observed fire intensity is high, there is an insignificant impact of fire-produced aerosols on the convective development of the pyroCb and associated changes in water vapor and the amount of cirrus cloud near the tropopause. However, as fire intensity weakens, the effects of aerosols on microphysical variables and processes such as droplet size and autoconversion increase. Modeling results shown herein indicate that aerosol-induced invigoration of convection is significant for pyroCb with weak-intensity fires and associated weak surface heat fluxes. Thus, there is a greater aerosol effect on the transportation of water vapor to the upper troposphere and the production of cirrus cloud with weak-intensity fires, whereas these effects are muted with strong-intensity fires.

Seoung Soo Lee et al.
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Short summary
This paper examines a thunderstorm-type cloud that is triggered by wild fire. This paper shows that this cloud has a substantial impact on air components such as water vapor that act as a global warming agent together with carbon dioxide. This paper also shows that that impact is strongly dependent on fire intensity. This raises a possibility that clouds, which are triggered by fire, act as a modulator of climate changes and this function as a modulator is altered by how intense fire is.
This paper examines a thunderstorm-type cloud that is triggered by wild fire. This paper shows...
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