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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2019-434
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2019-434
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 20 May 2019

Research article | 20 May 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).

Arabitol, mannitol and glucose as tracers of primary biogenic organic aerosol: influence of environmental factors on ambient air concentrations and spatial distribution over France

Abdoulaye Samaké1, Jean-Luc Jaffrezo1, Olivier Favez2, Samuël Weber1, Véronique Jacob1, Trishalee Canete1, Alexandre Albinet2, Aurélie Charron1,16, Véronique Riffault3, Esperanza Perdrix3, Antoine Waked1, Benjamin Golly1, Dalia Salameh1,a, Florie Chevrier1,4, Diogo Miguel Oliveira2,3, Jean-Luc Besombes4, Jean M. F. Martins1, Nicolas Bonnaire5, Sébastien Conil6, Géraldine Guillaud7, Boualem Mesbah8, Benoit Rocq9, Pierre-Yves Robic10, Agnès Hulin11, Sébastien Le Meur12, Maxence Descheemaecker13, Eve Chretien14, Nicolas Marchand15, and Gaëlle Uzu1 Abdoulaye Samaké et al.
  • 1University Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, IRD, INP-G, IGE (UMR 5001), 38000 Grenoble, France
  • 2INERIS, Parc Technologique Alata, BP 2, 60550 Verneuil-en-Halatte, France
  • 3IMT Lille Douai, University Lille, SAGE – Département Sciences de l’Atmosphère et Génie de l’Environnement, 59000 Lille, France
  • 4University Savoie Mont-Blanc, LCME, 73000 Chambéry, France
  • 5LSCE, UMR CNRS-CEA-UVSQ, 91191 Gif-sur Yvette, France
  • 6ANDRA DRD/GES Observatoire Pérenne de l’Environnement, 55290 Bure, France
  • 7Atmo Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes, 38400 Grenoble, France
  • 8Air PACA, 03040, France
  • 9Atmo Hauts de France, 59000, France
  • 10Atmo Occitanie, 31330 Toulouse, France
  • 11Atmo Nouvelle Aquitaine, 33000, France
  • 12Atmo Normandie, 76000, France
  • 13Lig'Air, 45590 Saint-Cyr-en-Val, France
  • 14Atmo Grand Est, 16034 Strasbourg, France
  • 15University Aix Marseille, LCE (UMR7376), Marseille, France
  • 16IFSTTAR, 69675 Bron, France
  • anow at: Airport pollution control authority (ACNUSA), 75007 Paris, France

Abstract. The primary sugar compounds (SC, defined as glucose, arabitol and mannitol) are widely recognized as suitable molecular markers to characterize and apportion primary biogenic organic aerosol emission sources. This work improves our understanding of the spatial behavior and distribution of these chemical species and evidences their major effective environmental drivers. We conducted a large study focusing on the daily (24 h) PM10 SC concentrations for 16 increasing space scale sites (local to nation-wide), over at least one complete year. These sites are distributed in several French geographic areas of different environmental conditions. Our analyses, mainly based on the examination of the short-term evolutions of SC concentrations, clearly show distance-dependent correlations. SC concentration evolutions are highly synchronous at an urban city-scale and remain well correlated throughout the same geographic regions, even if the sites are situated in different cities. However, sampling sites located in two distinct geographic areas are poorly correlated. Such pattern indicates that the processes responsible for the evolution of the atmospheric SC concentrations present a spatial homogeneity over typical areas of at least tens of kilometers. Local phenomena, such as resuspension of topsoil and associated microbiota, do no account for the major emissions processes of SC in urban areas not directly influenced by agricultural activities. The concentrations of SC and cellulose display remarkably synchronous temporal evolution cycles at an urban site in Grenoble, indicating a common source ascribed to vegetation. Additionally, higher concentrations of SC at another site located in a crop field region occur during each harvest periods, pointing out resuspension processes of plant materials (crop detritus, leaf debris) and associated microbiota for agricultural and nearby urbanized areas. Finally, ambient air temperature, relative humidity and vegetation density constitute the main effective drivers of SC atmospheric concentrations.

Abdoulaye Samaké et al.
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Short summary
We conducted a large study focusing on the daily (24 h) of PM10 sugar compounds (SC) concentrations for 16 increasing space scale sites in France (local to nation-wide), over at least one complete year. Our main results clearly show distance-dependent covariation patterns, with SC concentrations being highly synchronous at an urban city-scale and remain well correlated throughout the same geographic regions. However, sampling sites located in two distinct geographic areas are poorly correlated.
We conducted a large study focusing on the daily (24 h) of PM10 sugar compounds (SC)...
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