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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2019-343
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2019-343
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 03 May 2019

Submitted as: research article | 03 May 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. A revision of this manuscript was accepted for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP) and is expected to appear here in due course.

Source apportionment of volatile organic compounds in the north-west Indo–Gangetic Plain using positive matrix factorisation model

Pallavi, Baerbel Sinha, and Vinayak Sinha Pallavi et al.
  • Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Mohali, Sector 81, S.A.S Nagar, Manauli PO, Punjab, 140306, India

Abstract. In this study we undertook quantitative source apportionment for 32 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) measured at a suburban site in the densely populated North-West Indo–Gangetic Plain using the US EPA PMF 5.0 Model. Six sources were resolved by the PMF model namely biofuel use and waste disposal, wheat-residue burning, industrial emissions and solvent use, cars, two-wheelers and mixed daytime sources. The biofuel and waste disposal, wheat residue burning, industrial emissions and solvent use, combined traffic sources, mixed daytime sources accounted for 23.2 %, 22.4 %, 11.8 %, 25.1 %, and 15.7 % of the total VOC mass concentration respectively; 18.1 %, 32.4 %, 7.3 %, 21.9 %, and 20.3 % of the total O3 formation potential respectively; and 14.9 %, 13.9 %, 10.1 %, 59.0 %, and 2.2 % of the SOA formation potential, respectively. Further the factors contributed 24.6 %, 8.5 %, 20.1 %, 46.8 %, and 0 %, respectively, to the human class I carcinogen benzene and 18.4 %, 25.4 %, 5.9 %, 13.3 %, and 36.9 %, respectively, to the toxic emerging contaminant isocyanic acid. Evaluation of emission inventories using the in-situ data derived PMF solution revealed that among EDGARv4.2, REASv2.1 and GAINSv5.0, the GAINSv5.0 emission inventory for year 2010, best agreed with the in-situ data derived PMF results for May 2012.

Pallavi et al.
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Short summary
This study provides quantitative information regarding the source contributions of the major non-methane volatile organic compound sources in the Mohali in the North West Indo–Gangetic Plain. Combining in-situ data and model analyses, we show that REAS v2.1 and EDGAR v4.2 emission inventories overestimate the contribution residential biofuel use. EDGAR v4.2 severely underestimates the contribution of the transport sector. All annual emission inventories poorly represent crop residue burning.
This study provides quantitative information regarding the source contributions of the major...
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