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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2019-276
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2019-276
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: technical note 03 May 2019

Submitted as: technical note | 03 May 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).

Technical Note: Frenkel Halsey and Hill analysis of water on clay minerals: Toward closure between cloud condensation nuclei activity and water adsorption

Courtney D. Hatch, Paul R. Tumminello, Megan A. Cassingham, Ann L. Greenaway, Rebecca Meredith, and Matthew J. Christie Courtney D. Hatch et al.
  • Department of Chemistry, Hendrix College, 1600 Washington Ave., Conway, AR, 72032, USA

Abstract. Insoluble atmospheric aerosol, such as mineral dust, has been identified as an important contributor to the cloud droplet number concentration and indirect climate effect. However, empirically-derived Frenkel-Halsey-Hill (FHH) water adsorption parameters remain the largest source of uncertainty in assessing the effect of insoluble aerosol on climate using the FHH activation theory (FHH-AT). Furthermore, previously reported FHH water adsorption parameters for illite and montmorillonite determined from water adsorption measurements below 100 % RH do not satisfactorily agree with values determined from FHH-AT analysis of experimental cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements under supersaturated conditions. The work reported here uses previously reported experimental water adsorption measurements for illite and montmorillonite clays (Hatch et al., 2012; Hatch et al., 2014) to show that improved analysis methods that account for the surface microstructure are necessary to obtain better agreement of FHH parameters between water adsorption and experimental CCN-derived FHH parameters.

Courtney D. Hatch et al.
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Courtney D. Hatch et al.
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Latest update: 22 Aug 2019
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Short summary
Atmospheric mineral dust has been identified as an important contributor to cloud formation and cloud properties that influence the Earth's climate, yet experimental measurements of climate model parameters currently disagree. This study demonstrates current best practices for analyzing water adsorption measurements resulting in significantly improved agreement among experimental practices. As such, more accurate parameters can be used to improve simulations of aerosol climate effects.
Atmospheric mineral dust has been identified as an important contributor to cloud formation and...
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