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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2019-1024
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2019-1024
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 21 Nov 2019

Submitted as: research article | 21 Nov 2019

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This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).

Impact of Urban Emissions on a Biogenic Environment during the wet season: Explicit Modeling of the Manaus Plume Organic Chemistry with GECKO-A

Camille Mouchel-Vallon1, Julia Lee-Taylor1,2, Alma Hodzic1, Paulo Artaxo3, Bernard Aumont4, Marie Camredon4, David Gurarie5, Jose-Luis Jimenez2,6, Donald H. Lenschow7, Scot T. Martin8,9, Janaina Nascimento10,11, John J. Orlando1, Brett B. Palm2,6,a, John E. Shilling12, Manish Shrivastava12, and Sasha Madronich1 Camille Mouchel-Vallon et al.
  • 1Atmospheric Chemistry Observations and Modeling, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO 80301, USA
  • 2Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, USA
  • 3University of Sao Paulo, Institute of Physics, Rua do Matao 1371, 05508-090, Sao Paulo, S.P., Brazil
  • 4LISA, UMR CNRS 7583, Université Paris-Est-Créteil, Université de Paris, Institut Pierre Simon Laplace, Créteil, France
  • 5Department of Mathematics and Center for Global Health and Diseases, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106-7080, USA
  • 6Department of Chemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, USA
  • 7Mesoscale and Microscale Meteorology Laboratory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO 80301, USA
  • 8School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02318, USA
  • 9Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02318, USA
  • 10Post-graduate Program in Climate and Environment, National Institute for Amazonian Research and Amazonas State University, Manaus, AM, Brazil
  • 11Chemical Sciences Division, NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, Boulder, CO 80305, USA
  • 12Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352, USA
  • anow at: Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 91895, USA

Abstract. The GoAmazon 2014/5 field campaign took place in Manaus (Brazil) and allowed the investigation the interaction between background level biogenic air masses and anthropogenic plumes. We present in this work a box model built to simulate the impact of urban chemistry on biogenic Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) formation and composition. An organic chemistry mechanism is generated with the Generator for Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A) to simulate the explicit oxidation of biogenic and anthropogenic compounds. A parameterization is also included to account for the reactive uptake of isoprene oxidation products on aqueous particles. After some reductions of biogenic emissions relative to existing emission inventories, the model is able to reproduce measured primary compounds, ozone and NOx for clean or polluted situations. The explicit model is able to reproduce background case SOA mass concentrations but is underestimating the enhancement observed in the urban plume. Oxidation of biogenic compounds is the major contributor to SOA mass. A Volatility Basis Set parameterization (VBS) applied to the same cases obtains better results than GECKO-A for predicting SOA mass in the box model. The explicit mechanism may be missing SOA formation processes related to the oxidation of monoterpenes that could be implicitly accounted for in the VBS parameterization.

Camille Mouchel-Vallon et al.
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Camille Mouchel-Vallon et al.
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Short summary
The GoAmazon 2014/5 field campaign took place near the city of Manaus (Brazil), isolated in the Amazon rainforest, to study the impacts of urban pollution on natural air masses. We simulated this campaign with an extremely detailed organic chemistry model to understand how the city would affect the growth and composition of natural aerosol particles. Discrepancies between the model and the measurements indicate that the chemistry of naturally emitted organic compounds is still poorly understood.
The GoAmazon 2014/5 field campaign took place near the city of Manaus (Brazil), isolated in the...
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