Journal cover Journal topic
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 5.509 IF 5.509
  • IF 5-year value: 5.689 IF 5-year 5.689
  • CiteScore value: 5.44 CiteScore 5.44
  • SNIP value: 1.519 SNIP 1.519
  • SJR value: 3.032 SJR 3.032
  • IPP value: 5.37 IPP 5.37
  • h5-index value: 86 h5-index 86
  • Scimago H index value: 161 Scimago H index 161
Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-834
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-834
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 26 Sep 2018

Research article | 26 Sep 2018

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).

Organosulfates in Atlanta, Georgia: Anthropogenic influences on biogenic secondary organic aerosol formation

Anusha Priyadarshani Silva Hettiyadura1, Ibrahim M. Al-Naiema1, Dagen D. Hughes1, Ting Fang2,a, and Elizabeth A. Stone1 Anusha Priyadarshani Silva Hettiyadura et al.
  • 1Department of Chemistry, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA-52246, USA
  • 2School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, USA
  • anow at: University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697, USA

Abstract. This study examines the anthropogenic influence on biogenic organosulfate formation at an urban site in Atlanta, GA in the Southeastern United States. Organosulfates were analyzed in fine particulate matter (PM2.5) collected during August 2015 in Atlanta using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC), tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), and high-resolution time-of-flight (ToF) mass spectrometry. By their MS/MS response, 32 major organosulfate species were identified, selected species were quantified, and other species were semi-quantified using surrogate standards. Organosulfates accounted for 16.5% of PM2.5 organic carbon (OC). Isoprene-derived organosulfates were the most abundant, dominated by methyltetrol sulfate which accounted for 12.6% of PM2.5 OC. Together, the isoprene-derived organosulfates accounted for the majority of the isoprene-derived secondary organic aerosols (SOA) that had been previously observed in Atlanta, but had not been identified at the molecular level. Other major species included seven monoterpene-derived organosulfates, five diesel and/or biodiesel-derived organosulfates, and three new organosulfates that are also expected to derive from isoprene. Organosulfate species and concentrations in Atlanta were compared to those in a rural forested site in Centreville, AL during summer 2013, which were also dominated by isoprene-derived organosulfates. In Atlanta, isoprene-derived organosulfate concentrations were two to six times higher and accounted for twice as much OC. The greatest enhancement in concentration was observed for 2-methylglyceric acid sulfate, a tracer for isoprene high-NOx SOA. The isoprene-derived organosulfates indicated a stronger influence of NOx in Atlanta compared to Centreville. Overall, these results suggest that SOA in the Southeastern US can be reduced by controlling NOx and SO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion. This study gives insights into the major organosulfate species that should be targets for future measurements in urban environments and standard development.

Anusha Priyadarshani Silva Hettiyadura et al.
Interactive discussion
Status: open (until 21 Nov 2018)
Status: open (until 21 Nov 2018)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
[Subscribe to comment alert] Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Anusha Priyadarshani Silva Hettiyadura et al.
Anusha Priyadarshani Silva Hettiyadura et al.
Viewed  
Total article views: 441 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total Supplement BibTeX EndNote
317 119 5 441 16 3 3
  • HTML: 317
  • PDF: 119
  • XML: 5
  • Total: 441
  • Supplement: 16
  • BibTeX: 3
  • EndNote: 3
Views and downloads (calculated since 26 Sep 2018)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 26 Sep 2018)
Viewed (geographical distribution)  
Total article views: 441 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 439 with geography defined and 2 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Cited  
Saved  
No saved metrics found.
Discussed  
No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 20 Nov 2018
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
This study examines anthropogenic influences on secondary organic aerosol at an urban site in Atlanta, Georgia. Organosulfates accounted for 16.5 % of PM2.5 organic carbon and were mostly derived from isoprene. In comparison to a rural forested site, Atlanta’s isoprene-derived organosulfate concentrations were 2–6 times higher and accounted for twice as much organic carbon. Insights are provided as to which organosulfates should be measured in future studies and targeted for standard development.
This study examines anthropogenic influences on secondary organic aerosol at an urban site in...
Citation
Share