Journal cover Journal topic
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 5.509 IF 5.509
  • IF 5-year value: 5.689 IF 5-year 5.689
  • CiteScore value: 5.44 CiteScore 5.44
  • SNIP value: 1.519 SNIP 1.519
  • SJR value: 3.032 SJR 3.032
  • IPP value: 5.37 IPP 5.37
  • h5-index value: 86 h5-index 86
  • Scimago H index value: 161 Scimago H index 161
Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-800
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-800
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 31 Aug 2018

Research article | 31 Aug 2018

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).

Characterization of black carbon-containing fine particles in Beijing during wintertime

Junfeng Wang1, Dantong Liu2, Xinlei Ge1, Yangzhou Wu1, Fuzhen Shen1, Mindong Chen1, Jian Zhao3,4, Conghui Xie3,4, Qingqing Wang3, Weiqi Xu3,4, Jie Zhang5, Jianlin Hu1, James Allan2,6, Rutambhara Joshi2, Pingqing Fu3, Hugh Coe2, and Yele Sun3,4 Junfeng Wang et al.
  • 1Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Atmospheric Environment Monitoring and Pollution Control, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of In formation Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China
  • 2School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Manchester, M13 9PL, Manchester, UK
  • 3State Key Laboratory of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Physics and Atmospheric Chemistry, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029, China
  • 4University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China
  • 5Atmospheric Sciences Research Center, University at Albany, State University of New York, NY, 12203, USA
  • 6National Centre for Atmospheric Science, University of Manchester, M13 9PL, Manchester, UK

Abstract. Refractory black carbon (BC) is a product from incomplete combustion of fossil fuel, biomass and biofuel, etc. By mixing with other species, BC can play significant roles in climate change, visibility impairment and human health. Such BC-containing particles in very densely-populated megacities, like Beijing, may have specific sources and properties, that are very important to the haze formation and air quality. In this work, we characterized exclusively the BC-containing particles only in urban Beijing, by using a laser-only Aerodyne soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS), as a part of the Air Pollution and Human Health (APHH) 2016 winter campaign. The average mass ratio of coating-to-BC (RBC) was found to be ~5.0, much smaller than those of highly aged BC, indicating dominant contributions from primary emissions. Positive matrix factorization indeed shows the dominance of fossil fuel and biomass burning organics. Yet secondary species, including both sulfate, nitrate and oxygenated organic aerosol (OA) species, could have significant impacts on the properties of BC-containing particles, especially for ones with larger BC core sizes and thicker coatings. Analyses of the sources and diurnal cycles of organic coating reveal significant afternoon photochemical production of secondary OA (SOA), as well as the nighttime production of a portion of highly oxygenated OA. Besides SOA, photochemical production of nitrate, not sulfate, was very important. Further investigations on BC-containing particles at different periods show that, on average, more polluted periods would have more contributions from secondary species, and more thickly coated BC tended to associate with more secondary species, indicating the important role of chemical aging to the air pollution in urban Beijing during wintertime. However, for individual pollution events, aqueous-phase production of sulfate, nitrate and SOA might aggravate the pollution obviously under high relative humidity conditions, while sometimes local primary emissions (coal and biomass burning) could lead to serious and extremely polluted event too.

Junfeng Wang et al.
Interactive discussion
Status: final response (author comments only)
Status: final response (author comments only)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
[Login for Authors/Co-Editors] [Subscribe to comment alert] Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Junfeng Wang et al.
Junfeng Wang et al.
Viewed  
Total article views: 540 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total Supplement BibTeX EndNote
405 130 5 540 24 8 11
  • HTML: 405
  • PDF: 130
  • XML: 5
  • Total: 540
  • Supplement: 24
  • BibTeX: 8
  • EndNote: 11
Views and downloads (calculated since 31 Aug 2018)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 31 Aug 2018)
Viewed (geographical distribution)  
Total article views: 540 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 531 with geography defined and 9 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Cited  
Saved  
No saved metrics found.
Discussed  
No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 20 Nov 2018
Publications Copernicus
Special issue
Download
Short summary
This work is part of the UK-China APHH campaign. We used a laser-only Aerodyne soot particle aeroso mass spectrometer, for the first time, to investigate the concentrations, size distributions and chemical compositions for the ambient submicron aerosol particles only with black carbon as cores. Our findings are valubale to understand the BC properties and processes in the densely-populated megacities.
This work is part of the UK-China APHH campaign. We used a laser-only Aerodyne soot particle...
Citation
Share