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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-766
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-766
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 03 Aug 2018

Research article | 03 Aug 2018

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This discussion paper is a preprint. A revision of the manuscript is under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).

Diurnal cycle of coastal anthropogenic pollutant transport over southern West Africa during the DACCIWA campaign

Adrien Deroubaix1,2, Laurent Menut1, Cyrille Flamant2, Joel Brito9, Cyrielle Denjean6, Volker Dreiling7, Andreas Fink5, Corinne Jambert4, Norbert Kalthoff5, Peter Knippertz5, Russ Ladkin8, Sylvain Mailler1, Marlon Maranan5, Federica Pacifico4, Bruno Piguet6, Guillaume Siour3, and Solène Turquety1 Adrien Deroubaix et al.
  • 1LMD/IPSL, École Polytechnique, Université Paris Saclay, ENS, IPSL Research University; Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, CNRS, Palaiseau, France
  • 2LATMOS/IPSL, Sorbonne Université, Université Paris-Saclay & CNRS, Paris, France
  • 3LISA/IPSL, Laboratoire Interuniversitaire des Systèmes Atmosphériques (LISA), UMR CNRS 7583, Université Paris Est Créteil et Université Paris Diderot, Institut Pierre Simon Laplace, Créteil, France
  • 4LA, Laboratoire d'Aérologie, University of Toulouse, CNRS, UPS, Toulouse, France
  • 5KIT, Institute of Meteorology and Climate Research, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany
  • 6CNRM, Centre National de la Recherche Météorologique, UMR3589, CNRS, Météo-France, Toulouse, France
  • 7DLR, Deutsches Zentrum für Luft-und Raumfahrt, Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany
  • 8BAS, British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, UK
  • 9LAMP, Laboratoire de Météorologie Physique, Université Clermont Auvergne, Aubière, France

Abstract. During the monsoon season, pollutants emitted by large coastal cities and biomass burning plumes originating from Central Africa have complex transport pathways over Southern West Africa (SWA). The Dynamics–Aerosol–Chemistry–Cloud–Interactions in West Africa (DACCIWA) field campaign has provided numerous dynamical and chemical measurements in and around the super site of Savè in Benin (≈185km away from the coast), which allows quantifying the relative contribution of advected pollutants. Through the combination of in-situ ground measurements with aircraft, radio-sounding, satellite and high-resolution chemistry-transport modeling with the CHIMERE model, the source attribution and transport pathways of pollutants inland (here, NOx and CO) are carefully analyzed for the 1–7 July 2016 period. The relative contributions of different sources (i.e. emissions from several large coastal cities) on the air quality in Savè are characterized. It is shown that a systematic diurnal cycle exists with high surface concentrations of pollutants from 18:00 to 22:00UTC. This evening peak is attributed to pollution transport from the coastal city of Cotonou (Benin). Numerical model experiments indicates that the anthropogenic pollutants are accumulated during the day close to the coast, and transported northward as soon as the daytime convection in the atmospheric boundary layer ceases after 16:00UTC, reaching 8°N at 21:00UTC. When significant biomass burning pollutants are transported into continental SWA, they are mixed with anthropogenic pollutants along the coast during the day, and this mixture is then transported northward. At night, most of the coastal anthropogenic plumes are transported within the planetary boundary layer (below about 500m above ground level), whereas the biomass burning pollutants are mostly transported above it, thus generally not impacting ground level air quality.

Adrien Deroubaix et al.
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This article presents a detailed analysis of anthropogenic and biomass burning pollutants over the Gulf of Guinea coastal region, using observations from the DACCIWA field campaign and modeling. The novelty is that we focus on how these two pollution sources are mixed and transported further inland. We show that during the day pollutants are accumulated along the coastline pollutants, and transported northward as soon as the daytime convection in the atmospheric boundary layer ceases (16:00 UTC).
This article presents a detailed analysis of anthropogenic and biomass burning pollutants over...
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