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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-759
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-759
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 21 Sep 2018

Research article | 21 Sep 2018

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).

Lidar measurements of thin laminations within Arctic clouds

Emily M. McCullough, James R. Drummond, and Thomas J. Duck Emily M. McCullough et al.
  • Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, 6310 Coburg Rd., P.O. Box 15000, Halifax, NS, B3H 4R2, Canada

Abstract. Very thin (<10m) laminations within Arctic clouds have been observed in all seasons using the Canadian Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Change (CANDAC) Rayleigh-Mie-Raman lidar (CRL) at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL; located at Eureka, Nunavut in the Canadian High Arctic). CRL's high time (1min) and altitude (7.5m) resolution from 500m to 12+km altitude make these measurements possible. We have observed a variety of thicknesses for individual laminations, with some at least as thin as the detection limit of the lidar (7.5m). The clouds which contain the laminated features are typically found below 4km, can last longer than 24h, and occur most frequently during periods of snow and rain, often during very stable temperature inversion conditions. Results are presented for range-scaled photocounts at 532nm and at 355nm, ratios of 532/355nm photocounts, and 532nm linear depolarization parameter, with context provided by twice-daily Eureka radiosonde temperature and relative humidity profiles.

Emily M. McCullough et al.
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Emily M. McCullough et al.
Emily M. McCullough et al.
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Short summary
Very thin (< 10 m) laminations within Arctic clouds have been observed in all seasons using the Canadian Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Change (CANDAC) Rayleigh-Mie-Raman lidar (CRL) at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL at Eureka, Nunavut, Canadian High Arctic). The laminations can last longer than 24 h and are often associated with precipitation and atmospheric stability. This has implications for our understanding of cloud internal structure and processes.
Very thin ( 10 m) laminations within Arctic clouds have been observed in all seasons using the...
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