Journal cover Journal topic
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 5.509 IF 5.509
  • IF 5-year value: 5.689 IF 5-year 5.689
  • CiteScore value: 5.44 CiteScore 5.44
  • SNIP value: 1.519 SNIP 1.519
  • SJR value: 3.032 SJR 3.032
  • IPP value: 5.37 IPP 5.37
  • h5-index value: 86 h5-index 86
  • Scimago H index value: 161 Scimago H index 161
Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-735
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-735
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 05 Sep 2018

Research article | 05 Sep 2018

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).

Ice nucleating particles in the marine boundary layer in the Canadian Arctic during summer 2014

Victoria E. Irish1, Sarah J. Hanna1, Megan D. Willis2, Swarup China3, Jennie L. Thomas4, Jeremy J. B. Wentzell5, Ana Cirisan6, Meng Si1, W. Richard Leaitch7, Jennifer G. Murphy2, Jonathan P. D. Abbatt2, Alexander Laskin8, Eric Girard6, and Allan K. Bertram1 Victoria E. Irish et al.
  • 1Department of Chemistry, University of British Columbia, 2036 Main Mall, Vancouver BC, V6 T 1Z1, Canada
  • 2Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, 80 St George Street, Toronto, Ontario, ON M5S 3H6, Canada
  • 3Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354, USA
  • 4Laboratoire Atmosphères, Milieux et Observations Spatiales, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris CEDEX 05, France
  • 5Air Quality Research Division, Environment and Climate Change Canada, 4905 Dufferin Street, Toronto ON, M3H 5T4, Canada
  • 6Département des sciences de la Terre et de l'atmosphère, Université du Québec à Montréal, 201, avenue du Président – Kennedy, Montréal, Québec, QC H2X 3Y7, Canada
  • 7Climate Research Division, Environment and Climate Change Canada, 4905 Dufferin Street, Toronto ON, M3H 5T4, Canada
  • 8Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA

Abstract. Ice nucleating particles (INPs) in the Arctic can influence climate and precipitation in the region; yet our understanding of the concentrations and sources of INPs in this region remain uncertain. In the following we (1) measured concentrations of INPs in the Canadian Arctic marine boundary layer during summer 2014 on board the CCGS Amundsen, (2) determined ratios of surface areas of mineral dust aerosol to sea spray aerosol, and (3) investigated the source region of the INPs using particle dispersion modelling. Average concentrations of INPs at −15, −20 and −25°C were 0.005, 0.044, and 0.154L−1, respectively. These concentrations fall within the range of INP concentrations measured in other marine environments. For the samples investigated the ratio of mineral dust surface area to sea spray surface area ranged from 0.03 to 0.09. Based on these ratios and the ice active surface site densities of mineral dust and sea spray aerosol determined in previous laboratory studies, our results suggest that mineral dust is a more important contributor to the INP population than sea spray aerosol for the samples analysed. Based on particle dispersion modelling, the highest concentrations of INPs were often associated with lower latitude source regions such as the Hudson Bay area, eastern Greenland, or northwestern continental Canada. On the other hand, the lowest concentrations were often associated with regions further north of the sampling sites and over Baffin Bay. A weak correlation was observed between INP concentrations and the time the air mass spent over bare land, and a weak negative correlation was observed between INP concentrations and the time the air mass spent over ice and open water. These combined results suggest that mineral dust from local sources is an important contributor to the INP population in the Canadian Arctic marine boundary layer during summer 2014.

Victoria E. Irish et al.
Interactive discussion
Status: final response (author comments only)
Status: final response (author comments only)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
[Login for Authors/Co-Editors] [Subscribe to comment alert] Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Victoria E. Irish et al.
Victoria E. Irish et al.
Viewed
Total article views: 354 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total Supplement BibTeX EndNote
273 77 4 354 14 4 7
  • HTML: 273
  • PDF: 77
  • XML: 4
  • Total: 354
  • Supplement: 14
  • BibTeX: 4
  • EndNote: 7
Views and downloads (calculated since 05 Sep 2018)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 05 Sep 2018)
Viewed (geographical distribution)
Total article views: 354 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 354 with geography defined and 0 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Cited
Saved
No saved metrics found.
Discussed
No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 15 Nov 2018
Publications Copernicus
Special issue
Download
Short summary
Ice nucleating particles (INPs) are atmospheric particles that catalyse the formation of ice crystals in clouds. INPs influence the Earth's radiative balance and hydrological cycle. In this study we measured the concentrations of INPs in the Canadian Arctic marine boundary layer. Average INP concentrations fell within the range measured in other marine boundary layer locations. We also found that mineral dust is a more important contributor to the INP population than sea spray aerosol.
Ice nucleating particles (INPs) are atmospheric particles that catalyse the formation of ice...
Citation
Share