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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-721
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-721
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 04 Sep 2018

Research article | 04 Sep 2018

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This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).

Diagnosis of dust- and haze pollution-impacted PM10, PM2.5, and PM1 aerosols observed at Gosan Climate Observatory

Xiaona Shang1, Meehye Lee1, Saehee Lim1, Örjan Gustafsson2, Gangwoong Lee3, and Limseok Chang4 Xiaona Shang et al.
  • 1Department of Earth & Environmental Sciences, Korea University, Seoul, South Korea
  • 2Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM) and the Bolin Centre for Climate Research, Stockholm University, 10691 Stockholm, Sweden
  • 3Department of Environmental Science, Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, Seoul, South Korea
  • 4National Institute of Environmental Research (NIER), Incheon, South Korea

Abstract. In East Asia, soil dust is a major component of aerosols and is mixed with various pollutants during transport, resulting in large uncertainty in climate and environmental impact assessment and relevant policymaking. To diagnose the influence of soil dust and anthropogenic pollution on bulk aerosol, we conducted long-term measurements of mass, water-soluble ions, and carbonaceous compounds of PM10, PM2.5, and PM1 at Gosan Climate Observatory, South Korea, from August 2007 to February 2012. The principle component analyses of all measured species reveal that the impact of anthropogenic pollution, soil dust, and agricultural fertilizer accounts for 46%, 16%, and 9% of the total variance, respectively. Particularly, the loadings of agricultural component were high in the warmer months with the least occurrence of high concentration events and have increased over time. In mode analysis of PM10, PM2.5, and PM1 mass concentrations, the mean+σ was comparable to the 90th percentile and thus, suggested as a robust criterion that determines the substantial impact of soil dust and haze pollution on particulate matter. The results of this study imply that non-combustion sources such as soil dust will impose constraints to the reduction of PM2.5 as well as PM10 concentrations. In addition, questions are raised as to whether the yearly average concentration is suitable for environmental standard in northeast Asian region.

Xiaona Shang et al.
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Short summary
At Gosan Climate Observatory, the three main sources including anthropogenic pollution, soil dust, and agricultural fertilizer were distinguished for PM10, PM2.5, and PM1, which accounted for 71 % of the total variances for their mass and composition. The mass of mean + σ were comparable to the 90th percentile and the top 10 % implies the substantial impact of soil dust and haze pollution. In PM2.5, the contribution from non-combustion source such as soil dust should not be ignored.
At Gosan Climate Observatory, the three main sources including anthropogenic pollution, soil...
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