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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-700
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-700
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 03 Aug 2018

Research article | 03 Aug 2018

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This discussion paper is a preprint. A revision of the manuscript is under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).

Impact of mineral dust on shortwave and longwave radiation: evaluation of different vertically-resolved parameterizations in 1-D radiative transfer computations

Maria José Granados-Muñoz1, Michael Sicard1,2, Roberto Román3, Jose Antonio Benavent-Oltra4,5, Rubén Barragán1,2, Gerard Brogniez6, Cyrielle Denjean7,8, Marc Mallet7, Paola Formenti8, Benjamín Torres6,9, and Lucas Alados-Arboledas4,5 Maria José Granados-Muñoz et al.
  • 1Remote Sensing Laboratory/CommSensLab, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Barcelona, 08034, Spain
  • 2Ciències i Tecnologies de l'Espai – Centre de Recerca de l'Aeronàutica i de l'Espai/Institut d'Estudis Espacials de Catalunya (CTE-CRAE/IEEC), Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Barcelona, 08034, Spain
  • 3Grupo de Óptica Atmosférica (GOA), Universidad de Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain
  • 4Department of Applied Physics, University of Granada, 18071 Granada, Spain
  • 5Andalusian Institute for Earth System Research (IISTA-CEAMA), University of Granada, Autonomous Government of Andalusia, 18006 Granada, Spain
  • 6Laboratoire d’Optique Atmosphérique, University of Lille 1, Villeneuve d’Ascq, France
  • 7CNRM, Centre National de la Recherche Météorologique (UMR3589, CNRS, Météo-France), Toulouse, France
  • 8LISA, UMR CNRS 7583, Université Paris Est Créteil et Université Paris Diderot, Institut Pierre-Simon Laplace, Créteil, France
  • 9GRASP-SAS, Remote sensing developments, LOA/Université Lille-1, Villeneuve d’Ascq, France

Abstract. Aerosol radiative properties are investigated in South-eastern Spain during a dust event on June 16–17, 2013 in the framework of the ChArMEx/ADRIMED (Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment/Aerosol Direct Radiative Impact on the regional climate in the MEDiterranean region) campaign. Particle optical and microphysical properties from ground-based sun/sky photometer and lidar measurements, as well as in situ measurements onboard the SAFIRE ATR 42 French research aircraft are used to create a set of different levels of input parameterizations which feed the 1-D radiative transfer model (RTM) GAME (Global Atmospheric ModEl). We consider three datasets: 1) a first parametrization based on the retrievals by an advanced aerosol inversion code (GRASP; Generalized Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Properties) applied to combined photometer and lidar data; 2) a parameterization based on the photometer columnar optical properties and vertically-resolved lidar retrievals with the two-component Klett-Fernald algorithm; and 3) a parametrization based on vertically-resolved optical and microphysical aerosol properties measured in situ by the aircraft instrumentation. Once retrieved, the outputs of the RTM in terms of both shortwave and longwave radiative fluxes are contrasted against ground-, satellite- and in situ airborne measurements. In addition, the outputs of the model in terms of the aerosol direct radiative effect are discussed with respect to the different input parameterizations. Results show that calculated atmospheric radiative fluxes differ no more than 7% to the measured ones. The three parametrization datasets produce aerosol radiative effects with differences up to 10Wm−2 in the shortwave spectral range (mostly due to differences in the aerosol optical depth), and 2Wm−2 for the longwave (mainly due to differences in the aerosol optical depth but also to the coarse mode radius used to calculate the radiative properties). The study reveals the complexity of parameterizing 1-D RTMs as sizing and characterising the optical properties of mineral dust is challenging. The use of advanced remote sensing data and processing, in combination with closure studies on the optical/microphysical properties from in situ aircraft measurements when available, is recommended.

Maria José Granados-Muñoz et al.
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Maria José Granados-Muñoz et al.
Maria José Granados-Muñoz et al.
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Mineral dust influence in the direct radiative effect is affected by a large uncertainty. This study investigates mineral dust radiative properties during an episode affecting southern Spain on June 2013 by using remote sensors and data collected onboard an aircraft to feed a radiative transfer model. The study reveals the complexity of parameterizing these models, as characterizing mineral dust is still quite challenging, and the need for accurate mineral dust measurements.
Mineral dust influence in the direct radiative effect is affected by a large uncertainty. This...
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