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Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-636
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-636
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 20 Aug 2018

Research article | 20 Aug 2018

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).

Heat Transport Pathways into the Arctic and their Connections to Surface Air Temperatures

Daniel Mewes and Christoph Jacobi Daniel Mewes and Christoph Jacobi
  • Leipzig Institute for Meteorology, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany

Abstract. Arctic Amplification causes the meridional temperature gradient between middle and high latitudes to decrease. It is assumed that through this decrease the large-scale circulation changes and therefore the meridional transport of heat and moisture increases. This in turn may increase Arctic warming even further. To investigate patterns of Arctic temperature, horizontal fluxes and their changes in time, we analyzed ERA-Interim daily winter data of vertically integrated horizontal heat transport using Self-Organizing Maps (SOM). Three general transport pathways have been identified: the North Atlantic Pathway with transport mainly over the northern Atlantic, the North Pacific Pathway with transport from the Pacific region, and the Siberian Pathway with transport towards the Arctic over the eastern Siberian region. Transports that originate from the North Pacific are connected with negative temperature anomalies over the central Arctic. These North Pacific Pathways are getting less frequent during the last decades. Patterns with origin of transport in Siberia are found to have no trend and show cold temperature anomalies north of Svalbard. It was found that transport patterns that favor transport through the North Atlantic into the central Arctic are connected with positive temperature anomalies over large regions of the Arctic. These temperature anomalies resemble the warm Arctic cold continent effect. Further, it could be shown that transports through the North Atlantic are getting significantly more frequent during the last decades.

Daniel Mewes and Christoph Jacobi
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Daniel Mewes and Christoph Jacobi
Daniel Mewes and Christoph Jacobi
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Latest update: 20 Nov 2018
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Short summary
Horizontal heat transport patterns were extracted from reanalysis data using an artificial neuronal network for the winter months. The results show that during the last 30 years transport pathways that favours heat transport through the North Atlantic are getting significantly more frequent. This North Atlantic pathway is connected with positive temperature anomalies over the central Arctic, which implies a connection between Arctic amplification and the change in horizontal heat transport.
Horizontal heat transport patterns were extracted from reanalysis data using an artificial...
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