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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-547
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-547
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 25 Jun 2018

Research article | 25 Jun 2018

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. A revision of this manuscript was accepted for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP) and is expected to appear here in due course.

The Importance of Blowing Snow to Antarctic Aerosols: Number Distribution and more than Source-Dependent Composition – results from the 2ODIAC campaign

Michael R. Giordano1, Lars E. Kalnajs2, J. Douglas Goetz1,a, Anita M. Avery1,b, Erin Katz1, Nathaniel W. May3, Anna Leemon3, Claire Mattson3, Kerri A. Pratt3, and Peter F. DeCarlo1,4 Michael R. Giordano et al.
  • 1Department of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
  • 2Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colorado, USA
  • 3Department of Chemistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA
  • 4Department of Chemistry, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
  • anow at: Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colorado, USA
  • bnow at: Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, Massachusetts, USA

Abstract. A fundamental understanding of the processes that control Antarctic aerosols is necessary in determining the aerosol impacts on climate-relevant processes from Antarctic ice cores to clouds. The first in situ observational online composition measurements by an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) of Antarctic aerosols were only recently performed during the 2-Season Ozone Depletion and Interaction with Aerosols Campaign (2ODIAC) field campaign. 2ODIAC was deployed to sea ice on the Ross Sea near McMurdo Station over two field seasons: Austral spring-summer 2014 and winter-spring 2015. The results presented here focus on the overall trends in aerosol composition primarily as functions of air masses and local meteorological conditions. The results suggest that air mass back trajectories have little impact on either the absolute or relative concentrations of the aerosol constituents measured by (and inferred from) an AMS at a coastal location. However, when the data is parsed by wind speed, two observations become clear. First, a critical wind speed is required to loft snow from the surface, which, in turn, increases particle counts in all measured size bins. Second, this lofted (blowing) snow significantly increases both aerosol chloride and sodium. Further inspection of the AMS data shows that the increased chloride concentrations have distinctive signatures that differ from chloride measured at low wind speed. Also presented are the Cl:Na ratios of snow samples, aerosol filter samples, and non-chloride aerosol constituents measured by the AMS. Additionally, submicron aerosol iodine and bromine concentrations as functions of wind speed are also presented. The results presented here suggest that aerosol composition in coastal Antarctica is a strong function of wind speed and that the mechanisms determining aerosol composition are likely linked to blowing snow.

Michael R. Giordano et al.
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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Interactive discussion
Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Michael R. Giordano et al.
Michael R. Giordano et al.
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Short summary
The 2ODIAC field campaign was the first deployment of a high-resolution, real-time mass spectrometer to continental Antarctica. Using the real-time aerosol measurements, we investigate the how the composition of Antarctic sub-micron aerosols change as a function of meteorological parameters such as wind speed. We observe blowing snow and increasing aerosol concentration and changing composition as the wind increases beyond 8 m/s.
The 2ODIAC field campaign was the first deployment of a high-resolution, real-time mass...
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