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Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-545
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-545
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 18 Jun 2018

Research article | 18 Jun 2018

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This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).

Marine and terrestrial influences on ice nucleating particles during continuous springtime measurements in an Arctic oilfield location

Jessie M. Creamean1,2, Rachel M. Kirpes3, Kerri A. Pratt3, Nicholas J. Spada4, Maximilian Maahn1,2, Gijs de Boer1,2, Russell C. Schnell5, and Swarup China6 Jessie M. Creamean et al.
  • 1Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, 80309, USA
  • 2Physical Sciences Division, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO, 80305, USA
  • 3Department of Chemistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA
  • 4Air Quality Research Center, University of California, Davis, CA, 95616, USA
  • 5Global Monitoring Division, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO, 80305, USA
  • 6Environmental and Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, 99352, USA

Abstract. Aerosols that serve as ice nucleating particles (INPs) have the potential to modulate cloud microphysical properties and can therefore impact cloud radiative forcing and precipitation formation processes. In remote regions such as the Arctic, aerosol-cloud interactions are severely understudied yet may have significant implications for the surface energy budget and its impact on sea ice and snow surfaces. Further, uncertainties in model representations of heterogeneous ice nucleation are a significant hindrance to simulating Arctic mixed-phase cloud processes. We present results from a campaign called INPOP (Ice Nucleating Particles at Oliktok Point), which took place at a U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (DOE ARM) facility in the northern Alaskan Arctic. Three time- and size-resolved aerosol impactors were deployed from 1 Mar to 31 May 2017 for offline ice nucleation and chemical analyses and were co-located with routine measurements of aerosol number, size, chemistry, and radiative properties. The largest particles (i.e., ≥3μm or “coarse mode”) were the most efficient INPs. During periods with snow- and ice-covered surfaces, coarse mode INP concentrations were very low (maximum of 6×10−4L−1 at −15°C), but higher concentrations of warm temperature INPs were observed during late May (maximum of 2×10−2L−1 at −15°C). These higher concentrations were attributed to air masses originating from over sea ice leads and tundra surfaces. To our knowledge, these results represent the first INP characterization measurements in an Arctic oilfield location, and demonstrate strong influences from natural sources despite the relatively high pollution levels in this Arctic environment. Ultimately, these results can be used to evaluate the anthropogenic and natural influences on aerosol composition and Arctic cloud properties.

Jessie M. Creamean et al.
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Jessie M. Creamean et al.
Jessie M. Creamean et al.
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Short summary
Warm temperature ice nucleating particles (INPs) were observed during a springtime transition period of the melting of frozen surfaces in Northern Alaska. Such INPs were likely biological and from marine and terrestrial (tundra) sources. Influxes of these efficient INPs may have important implications for Arctic cloud ice formation, and consequently the surface energy budget.
Warm temperature ice nucleating particles (INPs) were observed during a springtime transition...
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