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Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-520
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-520
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 05 Oct 2018

Research article | 05 Oct 2018

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).

Cloud responses to climate variability over the extratropical oceans as observed by MISR and MODIS

Andrew Geiss and Roger Marchand Andrew Geiss and Roger Marchand
  • Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, 320 Atmospheric Sciences—Geophysics Building Box 351640, Seattle, Washington, 98195-1640

Abstract. Linear temporal trends in cloud fraction over the extratropical oceans, observed by NASA's Multiangle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR) during the period 2000–2013, are examined in the context of coincident ECMWF reanalysis data using a maximum covariance analysis. Changes in specific cloud types defined with respect to cloud top height and cloud optical depth are related to trends in reanalysis variables. A pattern of reduced high altitude optically thick cloud and increased low altitude cloud of moderate optical depth is found to be associated with increased temperatures, geopotential heights, and anticyclonicity over the extratropical oceans. These and other trends in cloud occurrence are shown to be correlated with changes in the El Niño Southern Oscillation, the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, the North Pacific Index, and the Southern Annular Mode.

Andrew Geiss and Roger Marchand
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Status: open (until 30 Nov 2018)
Status: open (until 30 Nov 2018)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Andrew Geiss and Roger Marchand
Andrew Geiss and Roger Marchand
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Short summary
13-year trends in cloud occurrence, observed by NASA's Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer, over the world's extratropical ocean basins are compared to trends in meteorological variables. We identify several patterns of changing cloud occurrence that correspond to specific patterns in trending meteorology. We find that many of these trends are related to changes in major modes of climate variability.
13-year trends in cloud occurrence, observed by NASA's Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer,...
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