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Discussion papers | Copyright
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-500
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 04 Jul 2018

Research article | 04 Jul 2018

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This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).

The SPARC water vapour assessment II: Profile-to-profile and climatological comparisons of stratospheric δD(H2O) observations from satellite

Charlotta Högberg1, Stefan Lossow2, Ralf Bauer3, Kaley A. Walker3, Patrick Eriksson4, Donal P. Murtagh4, Gabriele P. Stiller2, Jörg Steinwagner5, and Qiong Zhang1 Charlotta Högberg et al.
  • 1Stockholm University, Department of Physical Geography and the Bolin Centre for Climate Research, Svante Arrhenius väg 8, 10691 Stockholm, Sweden
  • 2Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Meteorology and Climate Research, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Leopoldshafen, Germany
  • 3University of Toronto, Department of Physics, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A7, Canada
  • 4Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Hörsalsvägen 11, 41296 Göteborg, Sweden
  • 5Max-Planck-Institute for extraterrestrial Physics, Gießenbachstraße 1, 85748 Garching, Germany

Abstract. Within the framework of the second SPARC (Stratosphere-troposphere Processes And their Role in Climate) water vapour assessment (WAVAS-II), we have evaluated five data sets of δD(H2O) obtained from observations of Odin/SMR (Sub-Millimetre Radiometer), Envisat/MIPAS (Environmental Satellite/Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding) and SCISAT/ACE-FTS (Science Satellite/Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier Transform Spectrometer) using profile-to-profile and climatological comparisons. Our focus is on stratospheric altitudes, but results from the upper troposphere to the lower mesosphere are provided. There are clear quantitative differences in the measurements of the isotopic ratio, which primarily concerns the comparisons to the SMR data set. In the lower stratosphere, this data set shows a higher depletion than the MIPAS and ACE-FTS data sets. The differences maximise close to 50hPa and exceed 200 per mille. With increasing altitude, the biases typically decrease. Above 4hPa, the SMR data set shows a lower depletion than the MIPAS data sets, on occasion exceeding 100 per mille. Overall, the δD biases of the SMR data set are driven by HDO biases in the lower stratosphere and by H2O biases in the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere. In between, in the middle stratosphere, the biases in δD are a combination of deviations in both HDO and H2O. These biases are attributed to issues with the calibration, in particular in terms of the sideband filtering for H2O, and uncertainties in spectroscopic parameters. The MIPAS and ACE-FTS data sets agree rather well between about 100hPa and 10hPa. The MIPAS data sets show less depletion below about 15hPa (up to about 30 per mille), due to differences in both HDO and H2O. Higher up the picture is reversed, and towards the upper stratosphere the biases typically increase. This is driven by increasing biases in H2O and on occasion the differences in δD exceed 80 per mille. Below 100hPa, the differences between the MIPAS and ACE-FTS data sets are even larger. In the climatological comparisons, the MIPAS data sets continue to show less depletion than the ACE-FTS data sets below 15hPa during all seasons, with some variations in magnitude. The differences between the MIPAS and ACE-FTS data come from different aspects, such as differences in the temporal and spatial sampling (except for the profile-to-profile comparisons), cloud influence, vertical resolution, and the microwindows and spectroscopic database chosen. Differences between data sets from the same instrument are typically small in the stratosphere.

Charlotta Högberg et al.
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Charlotta Högberg et al.
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Five data sets of δD(H2O) obtained from satellite observations have been evaluated using profile-to-profile and climatological comparisons. The focus is on stratospheric altitudes, but results from the upper troposphere to the lower mesosphere are provided. There are clear quantitative differences in the measurements of the isotopic ratio, especially in the upper troposphere and lower mesosphere. In the middle stratosphere the agreement between the data sets are rather good.
Five data sets of δD(H2O) obtained from satellite observations have been evaluated using...
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