Journal cover Journal topic
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-495
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Research article
13 Jun 2018
Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).
Eddy flux measurements of sulfur dioxide deposition to the sea surface
Jack G. Porter1, Warren de Bruyn2, and Eric S. Saltzman1 1Department of Chemistry and Department of Earth System Science, University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA, USA
2Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Chapman University, Orange, CA, USA
Abstract. Deposition to the sea surface is a major atmospheric loss pathway for many important trace gases, such as sulfur dioxide, (SO2). The air/sea transfer of SO2 is controlled entirely on the atmospheric side of the air/sea interface due to high effective solubility and other physical/chemical properties. There have been few direct field measurements of such fluxes due to the challenges associated with making fast response measurements of highly soluble trace gases at very low ambient levels. In this study, we report direct eddy covariance air/sea flux measurements of SO2, sensible heat, water vapor, and momentum. The measurements were made over shallow coastal waters from the Scripps Pier, La Jolla, CA using negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry as the SO2 sensor. The observed transfer velocities for SO2, sensible heat, water vapor, and momentum and their wind speed-dependences indicate that SO2 fluxes can be reliably measured using this approach. As expected, the transfer velocities for SO2, sensible heat, and water vapor are smaller than that for momentum, demonstrating the contribution of molecular diffusion to the overall air-side resistance to gas transfer. Furthermore, transfer velocities of SO2 were smaller than those of sensible heat and water vapor when observed simultaneously. This result is attributable to diffusive behavior in the interfacial layer of the air/sea interface.
Citation: Porter, J. G., de Bruyn, W., and Saltzman, E. S.: Eddy flux measurements of sulfur dioxide deposition to the sea surface, Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-495, in review, 2018.
Jack G. Porter et al.
Jack G. Porter et al.
Jack G. Porter et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 149 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)

HTML PDF XML Total Supplement BibTeX EndNote
116 30 3 149 5 2 2

Views and downloads (calculated since 13 Jun 2018)

Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 13 Jun 2018)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 149 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)

Thereof 149 with geography defined and 0 with unknown origin.

Country # Views %
  • 1

Saved

Discussed

Latest update: 23 Jun 2018
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
Deposition to the sea surface is a major loss pathway for many highly soluble atmospheric trace gases, but there are few direct field measurements of such fluxes. Here we report air/sea fluxes of sulfur dioxide, water vapor, and sensible heat in shallow coastal waters. The results are generally consistent with current models. Differences between transfer velocities of these quantities demonstrate the importance of molecular diffusion in the interfacial layer of the air/sea interface.
Deposition to the sea surface is a major loss pathway for many highly soluble atmospheric trace...
Share