Journal cover Journal topic
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 5.509 IF 5.509
  • IF 5-year value: 5.689 IF 5-year 5.689
  • CiteScore value: 5.44 CiteScore 5.44
  • SNIP value: 1.519 SNIP 1.519
  • SJR value: 3.032 SJR 3.032
  • IPP value: 5.37 IPP 5.37
  • h5-index value: 86 h5-index 86
  • Scimago H index value: 161 Scimago H index 161
Discussion papers | Copyright
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-285
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 16 Apr 2018

Research article | 16 Apr 2018

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).

Satellite-derived sulphur dioxide (SO2) emissions from the 2014–2015 Holuhraun eruption (Iceland)

Elisa Carboni1, Tamsin A. Mather2, Anja Schmidt3,4, Roy G. Grainger1, Melissa A. Pfeffer5, and Iolanda Ialongo6 Elisa Carboni et al.
  • 1COMET, Atmospheric, Oceanic and Planetary Physics, University of Oxford, Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU, UK
  • 2COMET, Department of Earth Science, University of Oxford, South Park Road, Oxford OX1 3AN, UK
  • 3Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB2 1EW, UK
  • 4Department of Geography, University of Cambridge, Downing Place, Cambridge CB2 3EN, UK
  • 5Icelandic Meteorological Office, Bustadavegur 7–9, Reykjavik, Iceland
  • 6Space and Earth Observation Centre, Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki, Finland

Abstract. The six-month-long 2014–2015 Holuhraun eruption was the largest in Iceland for 200 years, emitting huge quantities of sulphur dioxide (SO2) into the troposphere, at times overwhelming European anthropogenic emissions. Weather, terrain and latitude, made continuous ground-based or UV satellite sensor measurements challenging. Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) data, is used to derive the first time-series of daily SO2 mass and vertical distribution over the eruption period. A new optimal estimation scheme is used to calculate daily SO2 fluxes and average e-folding time every twelve hours. The algorithm is used to estimate SO2 fluxes of up to 200 kt per day and a minimum total SO2 erupted mass of 4.4±0.8Tg. The average SO2 e-folding time was 2.4±0.6 days. Where comparisons are possible, these results broadly agree with ground-based near-source measurements, independent remote-sensing data and model simulations of the eruption. The results highlight the importance of high-resolution time-series data to accurately estimate volcanic SO2 emissions.

Elisa Carboni et al.
Interactive discussion
Status: final response (author comments only)
Status: final response (author comments only)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
[Login for Authors/Co-Editors] [Subscribe to comment alert] Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Elisa Carboni et al.
Elisa Carboni et al.
Viewed
Total article views: 424 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total Supplement BibTeX EndNote
320 93 11 424 27 9 7
  • HTML: 320
  • PDF: 93
  • XML: 11
  • Total: 424
  • Supplement: 27
  • BibTeX: 9
  • EndNote: 7
Views and downloads (calculated since 16 Apr 2018)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 16 Apr 2018)
Viewed (geographical distribution)
Total article views: 424 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 421 with geography defined and 3 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Cited
Saved
No saved metrics found.
Discussed
No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 18 Oct 2018
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
The 2014–2015 Holuhraun eruption was the largest in Iceland for 200 years, emitting huge quantities of gas into the troposphere, at times overwhelming European anthropogenic emissions. Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer data, are used to derive the first time-series of daily sulphur dioxide mass and vertical distribution over the eruption period. A scheme is used to estimate: sulphur dioxide fluxes, the total erupted mass, and how long the sulphur dioxide remains in atmosphere.
The 2014–2015 Holuhraun eruption was the largest in Iceland for 200 years, emitting huge...
Citation
Share