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Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Discussion papers | Copyright
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-282
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 17 Apr 2018

Research article | 17 Apr 2018

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This discussion paper is a preprint. A revision of this manuscript was accepted for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP) and is expected to appear here in due course.

Estimating the open biomass burning emissions in Central and Eastern China from 2003 to 2015 based on satellite observation

Jian Wu1, Shaofei Kong2, Fangqi Wu2, Yi Cheng2, Shurui Zheng2, Qin Yan1, Huang Zheng2, Guowei Yang2, Mingming Zheng1, Dantong Liu3, Delong Zhao4, and Shihua Qi1,5 Jian Wu et al.
  • 1Department of Environmental Science and Technology, School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan, 430074, China
  • 2Department of Atmospheric Sciences, School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan, 430074, China
  • 3Centre for Atmospheric Sciences, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL, UK
  • 4Beijing Weather Modification Office, Beijing 100089, China
  • 5State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan, 430074, China

Abstract. Open biomass burning (OBB) has significant impacts on air pollution, climate change and potential human health. OBB has raised wide attention but with few focus on the annual variation of pollutant emission. Central and Eastern China (CEC) is one of the most polluted regions in China. This study aims to provide a state-of the-art estimation of the pollutant emissions from OBB in CEC from 2003 to 2015, by adopting the satellite observation dataset (the burned area product (MCD64Al) and the active fire product (MCD14 ML)), local biomass data (updated biomass loading data and high-resolution vegetation data) and local emission factors. Monthly emissions of pollutants were estimated and allocated into a 1×1km spatial grid for four types of OBB including grassland, shrubland, forest and cropland. From 2003 to 2015, the emissions from forest, shrubland and grassland fire burning had a minor annual variation whereas the emissions from crop straw burning steadily increased. The cumulative emissions of OC, EC, CH4, NOX, NMVOC, SO2, NH3, CO, CO2 and PM2.5 were 3.64×103, 2.87×102, 3.05×103, 1.82×103, 6.4×103, 2.12×102, 4.67×103, 4.59×104, 9.39×105 and 4.13×102Gg in these years, respectively. For cropland, corn straw burning was the largest contributor for all pollutant emissions, by 84%–96%. Among the forest, shrubland, grassland fire burning, forest fire burning emissions contributed the most and emissions from grassland fire was negligible due to few grass coverage in this region. High pollutant emissions were populated in the connection area of Shandong, Henan, Jiangsu and Anhui, with emission intensity higher than 100 ton per pixel, which was related to the frequent agricultural activities in these regions. The monthly emission peak of pollutants occurred in summer and autumn harvest periods including May, June, September and October, at which period ~50% of pollutants were emitted for OBB. This study highlights the importance in controlling the crops straw burning emission. From December to March of the next year, the crop residue burning emissions decreased, while the emissions from forest, shrubland and grassland exhibited their highest values, leading to another small peak emissions of pollutants. Obvious regional differences in seasonal variations of OBB were observed due to different local biomass types and environmental conditions. Rural population, agricultural output, local burning habits, anthropological activities and management policies are all influence factors for OBB emissions. The successful adoption of double satellite dataset for long term estimation of pollutants from OBB with a high spatial resolution can support the assessing of OBB on regional air-quality, especially for harvest periods or dry seasons. It is also useful to evaluate the effects of annual OBB management policies in different regions.

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Jian Wu et al.
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In order to support regional modeling impact on air quality and policy making on controlling open biomass burning emission, accurate open biomass burning emissions were estimated from 2003 to 2015 with high spatial and temporal resolution. Multiple satellite data, updated biomass data and survey results were all used to improve the accuracy. In addition, management policies and all influence factors in rural area for open biomass burning emissions were considered.
In order to support regional modeling impact on air quality and policy making on controlling...
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