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Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-183
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Research article
09 Mar 2018
Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. A revision of the manuscript is under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).
Concentration, temporal variation and sources of black carbon in the Mount Everest region retrieved by real-time observation and simulation
Xintong Chen1,4, Shichang Kang1,2,4, Zhiyuan Cong2,3, Junhua Yang1, and Yaoming Ma3 1State Key Laboratory of Cryospheric Science, Northwest Institute of Eco-Environment and Resources, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000, China
2CAS Center for Excellence in Tibetan Plateau Earth Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100101, China
3Key Laboratory of Tibetan Environment Changes and Land Surface Processes, Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China
4University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China
Abstract. Based on the high-resolution measurement of black carbon (BC) at Qomolangma (Everest) station of Chinese Academy of Sciences during 15 May 2015 to 31 May 2017, we investigated the seasonal and diurnal variations of BC and its potential source regions. Monthly and daily mean BC concentrations reached the highest values in the pre-monsoon season which are at least one magnitude higher than the lowest values in the monsoon season. For the diurnal variation, BC concentrations were significantly greater from mid-night to noon in the pre-monsoon season and showed increasing trend in the afternoon in the non-monsoon seasons, implying the potential contribution from the long-range transport. In the monsoon season, BC concentrations appeared two peaks in the morning and after the noon, might be affected by the local anthropogenic activities. By analyzing the simulation results from the backward air-mass trajectories and the fire spots distribution from the MODIS data, we found that the seasonal cycle of BC was significantly influenced by atmospheric circulation and combustion intensity in the Mt. Everest region. The transport mechanisms of BC were revealed using WRF-Chem simulation during severe pollution episodes. For the pollution event in the monsoon season, BC aerosols in South Asia could be uplifted and transported to the Mt. Everest region by the southward winds in the upper atmosphere. However, for the events in the pre-monsoon season, BC from northern India was brought and concentrated in the southern slope of the Himalayas by the northwesterly winds in the lower atmosphere and then transported across the Himalayas by the mountain-valley wind, while relatively less BC from northwestern India and Central Asia could be transported to the Mt. Everest region by the westerly winds in the upper atmosphere.
Citation: Chen, X., Kang, S., Cong, Z., Yang, J., and Ma, Y.: Concentration, temporal variation and sources of black carbon in the Mount Everest region retrieved by real-time observation and simulation, Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-183, in review, 2018.
Xintong Chen et al.
Xintong Chen et al.
Xintong Chen et al.

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