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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-1334
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-1334
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 28 Jan 2019

Submitted as: research article | 28 Jan 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. A revision of the manuscript is under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).

Aerosol indirect effects on the temperature-precipitation scaling

Nicolas Da Silva1, Sylvain Mailler1,2, and Philippe Drobinski1 Nicolas Da Silva et al.
  • 1LMD/IPSL, École polytechnique, Université Paris Saclay, ENS, PSL Research University, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, CNRS, Palaiseau, France
  • 2ENPC, Champs-sur-Marne, France

Abstract. Indirect effects of aerosols were found to weaken convective precipitation through reduced precipitable water and convective instability. The present study aims at quantifying the relative importance of these two processes in the reduction of summer precipitation using the temperature-precipitation scaling. Based on a numerical sensitivity experiment conducted over central Europe aiming to isolate indirect effects, all others effects being equal, the results show that the scaling of hourly convective precipitation with temperature follows the Clausius-Clapeyron (CC) relationship whereas the decrease of convective precipitation does not scale with the CC law since it is mostly attributable to increased stability with increased aerosols concentrations rather than to decreased precipitable water content. This effect is larger at low temperatures for which clouds are statistically more frequent and optically thicker. At these temperatures, the increase of stability is mostly linked to the stronger reduction of temperature in the lower troposphere compared to the upper troposphere which results in lower lapse rates.

Nicolas Da Silva et al.
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Nicolas Da Silva et al.
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Aerosol indirect effect sensitivities N. Da Silva https://doi.org/10.14768/mistrals-hymex.1503

Nicolas Da Silva et al.
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Short summary
Mycrophysical effects of aerosols were found to weaken precipitation in an Euro-Mediterranean area. The present numerical study quantify the processes that may be involved through the use of the temperature-precipitation relationship. It shows larger aerosol effects at low temperatures. At these temperatures, the most contributing process is the increase of atmospheric stability through an enhanced aerosol cooling effect in the lower troposphere compared to the upper troposphere.
Mycrophysical effects of aerosols were found to weaken precipitation in an Euro-Mediterranean...
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