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Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-1302
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-1302
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 07 Jan 2019

Research article | 07 Jan 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).

The Influence of Simulated Surface Dust Lofting Erodible Fraction on Radiative Forcing

Stephen M. Saleeby1, Susan C. van den Heever1, Jennie Bukowski1, Annette L. Walker2, Jeremy E. Solbrig3, Samuel A. Atwood1, Qijing Bian1, Sonia M. Kreidenweis1, Yi Wang4, Jun Wang4, and Steven D. Miller3 Stephen M. Saleeby et al.
  • 1Department of Atmospheric Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado
  • 2Naval Research Laboratory, Monterey, California
  • 3Cooporative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere, Fort Collins, Colorado
  • 4Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Informatics, and Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa

Abstract. The use of dust erodible fraction geographical databases in case-study numerical simulations provides more realistic dust loading compared to idealized, non-spatially-constrained methods. Idealized lofting in case study scenarios tends to generate unrealistically large amounts of dust compared to observations, due to the lack of locational constraints. Generally, simulations of enhanced dust mass via surface lofting lead to reductions in daytime insolation due to aerosol scattering effects, as well as reductions in nighttime radiative cooling due to aerosol absorption effects. In simulations with extreme dust concentrations, these effects noticeably suppress the model environment’s diurnal temperature range. In simulations with lesser amounts of lofted dust, the presence of dust is shown to still strongly impact the radiative fluxes while only marginally modifying the low-level temperature. Increased resolution in dust erodible fraction inventories are shown to enhance the details of dust lofting locations and potential, thereby, mitigate over-lofting and associated radiative response biases over regions that are unlikely source locations.

Stephen M. Saleeby et al.
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Stephen M. Saleeby et al.
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This study seeks to understand how intense dust storms impact the heating and cooling of the land surface and atmosphere. Dust storms that are intense enough to substantially impact visibility can also alter how much sunlight reaches the surface during the day and how much heat is trapped in the atmosphere at night. These radiation changes can impact the temperature of the atmosphere and impact the weather in the vicinity.
This study seeks to understand how intense dust storms impact the heating and cooling of the...
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