Journal cover Journal topic
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 5.509 IF 5.509
  • IF 5-year value: 5.689 IF 5-year 5.689
  • CiteScore value: 5.44 CiteScore 5.44
  • SNIP value: 1.519 SNIP 1.519
  • SJR value: 3.032 SJR 3.032
  • IPP value: 5.37 IPP 5.37
  • h5-index value: 86 h5-index 86
  • Scimago H index value: 161 Scimago H index 161
Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-1198
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-1198
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 06 Dec 2018

Research article | 06 Dec 2018

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).

Impacts of Household Sources on Air Pollution at Village and Regional Scales in India

Brigitte Rooney1, Ran Zhao1,a, Kelvin H. Bates1,b, Ajay Pillarisetti2, Sumit Sharma3, Seema Kundu3, Tami C. Bond4, Nicholas L. Lam4,c, Bora Ozaltun4, Li Xu4, Lauren T. Fleming5, Robert Weltman5, Simone Meinardi5, Donald R. Blake5, Sergey A. Nizkorodov5, Rufus D. Edwards6, Ankit Yadav7, Narendra K. Arora7, Kirk R. Smith2, and John H. Seinfeld1 Brigitte Rooney et al.
  • 1Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering and Division of Engineering and Applied Science, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA
  • 2School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
  • 3The Energy and Resources Institute (TERI) , New Delhi – 110003, India
  • 4Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL 61801, USA
  • 5Department of Chemistry, University of California, Irvine CA 92697, USA
  • 6Department of Epidemiology, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697, USA
  • 7The INCLEN Trust, Okhla Industrial Area, Phase-I, New Delhi – 110020, India
  • acurrent address: Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2R3
  • bcurrent address: Center for the Environment, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
  • ccurrent address: Schatz Energy Research Center, Humboldt State University, Arcata, CA 95521, USA

Abstract. Approximately 3 billion people worldwide cook with solid fuels, such as wood, charcoal, and agricultural residues. These fuels are often combusted in inefficient cookstoves, producing carbonaceous emissions. Between 2.6 and 3.8 million premature deaths occur as a result to exposure to fine particulate matter from the resulting household air pollution (Health Effects Institute, 2018a; World Health Organization, 2018). Household air pollution also contributes to ambient air pollution; the magnitude of this contribution is uncertain. Here, we simulate the distribution of the two major health-damaging outdoor air pollution species (PM2.5 and O3) using state-of-the-science emissions databases and atmospheric chemical transport models to estimate the impact of household combustion on ambient air quality in India. The present study focuses on New Delhi and the SOMAARTH Demographic, Development, and Environmental Surveillance Site (DDESS) in the Palwal District of Haryana, located about 80km south of New Delhi. The DDESS covers an approximate population of 200000 within 52 villages. The emissions inventory used in the present study was prepared based on a national inventory in India (Sharma et al., 2015, 2016), an updated residential sector inventory prepared at the University of Illinois, updated cookstove emissions factors from Fleming et al. (2018b), and PM2.5 speciation from cooking fires from Jayarathne et al. (2018). Simulation of regional air quality was carried out using the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Community Multiscale Air Quality modeling system (CMAQ), in conjunction with the Weather Research and Forecasting modeling system (WRF) to simulate the meteorological inputs for CMAQ, and the global chemical transport model GEOS-Chem to generate concentrations on the boundary of the computational domain. Comparisons between observed and simulated O3 and PM2.5 levels are carried out to assess overall airborne levels and to estimate the contribution of household cooking emissions. Observed and predicted ozone levels over New Delhi during September 2015, December 2015, and September 2016 routinely exceeded 150μgm−3, as compared with the 8-hour Indian standard of 100μgm−3, and, on occasion, exceeded 200μgm−3. PM2.5 levels are predicted over the SOMAARTH headquarters (September 2015 and September 2016), Bajada Pahari (a village in the surveillance site, September 2015, December 2015, and September 2016), and New Delhi (September 2015, December 2015, and September 2016). Predicted levels vary depending on the time of year but, on the whole, tend to be somewhat less than those observed. The predicted fractional impact of residential emissions on PM2.5 levels varies from about 0.30 in SOMAARTH HQ and Bajada Pahari to about 0.10 in New Delhi. Predicted levels of secondary organic PM2.5 during the periods studied at the three locations averaged about 5μgm−3, representing approximately 10% of total PM2.5 levels, accentuating the dominant role played by primary carbonaceous emissions in all three locations.

Brigitte Rooney et al.
Interactive discussion
Status: open (until 31 Jan 2019)
Status: open (until 31 Jan 2019)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
[Subscribe to comment alert] Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Brigitte Rooney et al.
Brigitte Rooney et al.
Viewed  
Total article views: 249 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
185 63 1 249 0 0
  • HTML: 185
  • PDF: 63
  • XML: 1
  • Total: 249
  • BibTeX: 0
  • EndNote: 0
Views and downloads (calculated since 06 Dec 2018)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 06 Dec 2018)
Viewed (geographical distribution)  
Total article views: 204 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 203 with geography defined and 1 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Cited  
Saved  
No saved metrics found.
Discussed  
No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 13 Dec 2018
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
Approximately 3 billion people worldwide cook with solid fuels, such as wood, charcoal, and agricultural residues, that are often combusted in inefficient cookstoves. Here, we simulate the distribution of the two major health-damaging outdoor pollution species (PM2.5 and O3) using state-of-the-science emissions databases and atmospheric chemical transport models to estimate the impact of household combustion on ambient air quality in India.
Approximately 3 billion people worldwide cook with solid fuels, such as wood, charcoal, and...
Citation
Share