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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-1181
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-1181
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 14 Dec 2018

Research article | 14 Dec 2018

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This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).

New particle formation events observed at the King Sejong Station, Antarctic Peninsula – Part 2: Link with the oceanic biological activities

Eunho Jang1,2,*, Ki-Tae Park1,*, Young Jun Yoon1, Tae-Wook Kim3, Sang-Bum Hong1, Silvia Becagli4, Rita Traversi4, Jaeseok Kim5, and Yeontae Gim1 Eunho Jang et al.
  • 1Korea Polar Research Institute, 26 Songdomirae-ro, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon 21990, South Korea
  • 2University of Science and Technology, 217 Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34113, South Korea
  • 3Division of Environmental Science and Ecological Engineering, Korea University, Seoul, South Korea
  • 4Department of Chemistry Ugo Schiff, University of Florence, via della Lastruccia, 3, Sesto F.no (FI), 50019, Italy
  • 5Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, 267 Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34113, South Korea
  • *These authors contributed equally to this work.

Abstract. Marine biota is an important source of atmospheric aerosols in the remote marine atmosphere. Long-term observations (from 2009 to 2016) of the physical properties of atmospheric aerosol particles measured at the Antarctic Peninsula (King Sejong Station; 62.2°S, 58.8°W) and satellite-derived estimates of the biological characteristics were analyzed to identify the link between new particle formation and marine biota. New particle formation events in the Antarctic atmosphere showed distinct seasonal variations, with the highest values occurring during austral summer (December, January and February). Interestingly, new particle formation events were more frequent in the air masses that originated from the Bellingshausen Sea than in those that originated from the Weddell Sea. The monthly mean number concentration of nanoparticles (2.5–10nm in diameter) was >2-fold when the air masses passed over the Bellingshausen Sea than the Weddell Sea, whereas the biomass of phytoplankton in the Weddell Sea was more than ~70% higher than that of the Bellingshausen Sea during the austral summer period. Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is of marine origin and its oxidative products are known to be one of the major components in the formation of new particles. Both satellite-derived estimates of the biological characteristics (dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP; precursor of DMS) and phytoplankton taxonomic composition) and in situ methanesulfonic acid (MSA; oxidation product of DMS) analysis revealed that DMS(P)-rich phytoplankton were more dominant in the Bellingshausen Sea than in the Weddell Sea. Furthermore, the number concentration of nanoparticles was positively correlated with the biomass of phytoplankton during the period when DMS(P)-rich phytoplankton predominate. These results indicate that oceanic DMS emissions could play a key role in the formation of new particles; moreover, the taxonomic composition of phytoplankton could affect the formation of secondary organic aerosols in the Antarctic Ocean.

Eunho Jang et al.
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We reported long-term observations (from 2009 to 2016) of the nanoparticles measured at the Antarctic Peninsula (62.2° S, 58.8° W) and satellite-derived estimates of the biological characteristics were analyzed to identify the link between new particle formation and marine biota. The key finding from this research is that the formation of nanoparticles was strongly associated not only with the biomass of phytoplankton but, more importantly, also its taxonomic composition in the Antarctic Ocean.
We reported long-term observations (from 2009 to 2016) of the nanoparticles measured at the...
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