Journal cover Journal topic
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 5.509 IF 5.509
  • IF 5-year value: 5.689 IF 5-year 5.689
  • CiteScore value: 5.44 CiteScore 5.44
  • SNIP value: 1.519 SNIP 1.519
  • SJR value: 3.032 SJR 3.032
  • IPP value: 5.37 IPP 5.37
  • h5-index value: 86 h5-index 86
  • Scimago H index value: 161 Scimago H index 161
Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-1131
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-1131
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 06 Dec 2018

Research article | 06 Dec 2018

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).

Spatial and temporal variability of turbulence dissipation rate in complex terrain

Nicola Bodini1, Julie K. Lundquist1,2, Raghavendra Krishnamurthy3, Mikhail Pekour4, and Larry K. Berg4 Nicola Bodini et al.
  • 1Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado, USA
  • 2National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado, USA
  • 3University of Notre-Dame, Notre-Dame, Indiana, USA
  • 4Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington, USA

Abstract. To improve the parametrizations of turbulence dissipation rate (ε) in numerical weather prediction models, the temporal and spatial variability of ε must be assessed. In this study, we explore influences on the variability of ε at various scales in the Columbia River Gorge during the WFIP2 field experiment between 2015 and 2017. We calculate ε from five sonic anemometers all deployed in a ~4km2 area; and from two scanning Doppler lidars and four profiling Doppler lidars, whose locations span a ~300km wide region. We retrieve ε from the sonic anemometers using the second-order structure function method, from the scanning lidars with the azimuth structure function approach, and from the profiling lidars with a novel technique using the variance of the line-of-sight velocity. Turbulence dissipation rate shows large spatial variability, even at the microscale, especially during nighttime stable conditions. Orographic features have a strong impact on the variability of ε, with the correlation between ε at different stations being highly influenced by terrain. ε shows larger values in sites located downwind of complex orographic structures or in wind farm wakes. A clear diurnal cycle in ε is found, with daytime convective conditions determining values over an order of magnitude higher than nighttime stable conditions. ε also shows a distinct seasonal cycle, with differences greater than an order of magnitude between average ε values in summer and winter.

Nicola Bodini et al.
Interactive discussion
Status: open (until 31 Jan 2019)
Status: open (until 31 Jan 2019)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
[Subscribe to comment alert] Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Nicola Bodini et al.
Nicola Bodini et al.
Viewed  
Total article views: 167 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total Supplement BibTeX EndNote
133 33 1 167 3 1 0
  • HTML: 133
  • PDF: 33
  • XML: 1
  • Total: 167
  • Supplement: 3
  • BibTeX: 1
  • EndNote: 0
Views and downloads (calculated since 06 Dec 2018)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 06 Dec 2018)
Viewed (geographical distribution)  
Total article views: 126 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 125 with geography defined and 1 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Cited  
Saved  
No saved metrics found.
Discussed  
No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 13 Dec 2018
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
To improve the parametrization of turbulence dissipation rate (ε) in numerical weather prediction models, we have assessed its temporal and spatial variability at various scales in the Columbia River Gorge during the WFIP2 field experiment. Turbulence dissipation rate shows large spatial variability, even at the microscale, with larger values in sites located downwind of complex orographic structures or in wind farm wakes. Distinct diurnal and seasonal cycles in ε have also been found.
To improve the parametrization of turbulence dissipation rate (ε) in numerical weather...
Citation
Share