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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-1104
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-1104
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 03 Dec 2018

Research article | 03 Dec 2018

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This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).

Direct radiative effect of dust-pollution interactions

Klaus Klingmüller1, Jos Lelieveld1,2, Vlassis A. Karydis1,3, and Georgiy L. Stenchikov4 Klaus Klingmüller et al.
  • 1Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Hahn-Meitner-Weg 1, 55128 Mainz, Germany
  • 2The Cyprus Institute, P.O. Box 27456, 1645 Nicosia, Cyprus
  • 3Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, IEK-8, 52425 Jülich, Germany
  • 4King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal 23955-6900, Saudi Arabia

Abstract. The chemical ageing of aeolian dust, through interactions with air pollution, affects the optical and hygroscopic properties of the mineral particles and hence their atmospheric residence time and climate forcing. Conversely, the chemical composition of the dust particles and their role as coagulation partners impact the abundance of particulate air pollution. This results in an anthropogenic radiative forcing associated with mineral dust notwithstanding the natural origin of most aeolian dust. Using the atmospheric chemistry climate model EMAC with a detailed parametrisation of ageing processes and an emission scheme accounting for the chemical composition of desert soils, we study the direct radiative forcing globally and regionally. Our results indicate large positive and negative forcings, depending on the region. The predominantly negative forcing at the top of the atmosphere over large parts of the dust belt, from West Africa to East Asia, attains a maximum of about −2W/m2 south of the Sahel, in contrast to a positive forcing over India. Globally averaged, these forcings partially counterbalance, resulting in a net negative forcing of −0.05W/m2, which nevertheless represents a considerable fraction of the total dust forcing.

Klaus Klingmüller et al.
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Within the atmosphere desert dust and anthropogenic pollution are mixed and interact which affects the abundance and optical properties of the particulate matter. This results in an anthropogenic climate forcing associated with mineral dust notwithstanding the natural origin of most aeolian dust. With a global chemistry-climate model we estimate this forcing to represent a considerable fraction of the total dust forcing.
Within the atmosphere desert dust and anthropogenic pollution are mixed and interact which...
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