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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-1034
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-1034
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 06 Dec 2018

Research article | 06 Dec 2018

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).

Extending the SBUV PMC Data Record with OMPS NP

Matthew T. DeLand1 and Gary E. Thomas2 Matthew T. DeLand and Gary E. Thomas
  • 1Science Systems and Applications, Inc. (SSAI), Lanham, Maryland 20706, USA
  • 2Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP)/University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80303, USA

Abstract. We have utilized Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV) instrument measurements of atmospheric radiance to create a 40-year record of polar mesospheric cloud (PMC) behavior. While this series of measurements is nearing its end, we show in this paper that Ozone Mapping and Profiling Suite (OMPS) Nadir Profiler (NP) instruments can be added to the merged SBUV PMC data record. Regression analysis of this extended record shows smaller trends in PMC ice water content (IWC) since approximately 1998, consistent with previous work. Current trends are statistically significant in the Northern Hemisphere, but not in the Southern Hemisphere. The PMC IWC response to solar activity has decreased in the Northern Hemisphere since 1998, but has apparently increased in the Southern Hemisphere.

Matthew T. DeLand and Gary E. Thomas
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Status: open (until 31 Jan 2019)
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Matthew T. DeLand and Gary E. Thomas
Matthew T. DeLand and Gary E. Thomas
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We have extended our 40-year satellite data record of polar mesospheric cloud (PMC) behavior by adding data from a new instrument. Long-term trends in PMC ice water content derived from this record are smaller since 1998 compared to the first part of our data record. The PMC response to solar activity has decreased in the Northern Hemisphere but increased in the Southern Hemisphere, for reasons that are not understood.
We have extended our 40-year satellite data record of polar mesospheric cloud (PMC) behavior by...
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