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Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2017-967
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Research article
19 Oct 2017
Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).
Dome effect of black carbon and its key influencing factors: A one-dimensional modelling study
Zilin Wang1,2, Xin Huang1,2, and Aijun Ding1,2 1Joint International Research Laboratory of Atmospheric and Earth System Sciences, School of Atmospheric Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210023, China
2Jiangsu Provincal Collorative Innovation Center of Climate Change, Nanjing, 210023, China
Abstract. Black carbon (BC) has been identified to play a critical role in aerosol-planet boundary layer (PBL) interaction and further deterioration of near-surface air pollution in megacities, which has been named as its dome effect. However, the impacts of key factors that influence this effect, such as the vertical distribution and aging processes of BC, and also the underlying land surface, have not been quantitatively explored yet. Here, based on available in-situ measurements of meteorology and atmospheric aerosols together with the meteorology-chemistry online coupled model, WRF-Chem, we conduct a set of parallel simulations to quantify the roles of these factors in influencing the BC's dome effect and surface haze pollution, and discuss the main implications of the results to air pollution mitigation in China. We found that the impact of BC on PBL is very sensitive to the altitude of aerosol layer. The upper level BC, especially those near the capping inversion, is more essential in suppressing the PBL height and weakening the turbulence mixing. The dome effect of BC tends to be significantly intensified as BC aerosol mixed with scattering aerosols during winter haze events, resulting in a decrease of PBL height by more than 25 %. In addition, the dome effect is more substantial (up to 15 %) in rural areas than that in the urban areas with the same BC loading, indicating an unexpected regional impact of such kind of effect to air quality in countryside. This study suggests that China's regional air pollution would greatly benefit from BC emission reductions, especially those from the elevated sources from the chimneys and also the domestic combustions in rural areas, through weakening the aerosol-boundary layer interactions that triggered by BC.

Citation: Wang, Z., Huang, X., and Ding, A.: Dome effect of black carbon and its key influencing factors: A one-dimensional modelling study, Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2017-967, in review, 2017.
Zilin Wang et al.
Zilin Wang et al.
Zilin Wang et al.

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Short summary
Black carbon is of great importance in aerosol-boundary layer interaction (named as dome effect). Key factors, like vertical profile and aging of aerosol, and underlying surface, are explored by meteorology-chemistry coupled model. We found this effect is sensitive to altitude of aerosol and can be intensified by aging process. Besides, the effect is more substantial in rural areas. China's air pollution would benefit from black carbon reduction from elevated sources and domestic combustion.
Black carbon is of great importance in aerosol-boundary layer interaction (named as dome...
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