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Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2017-889
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Research article
09 Jan 2018
Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).
Aerosol chemistry and particle growth events at an urban downwind site in the North China Plain
Yingjie Zhang1,2,*, Wei Du1,3,*, Yuying Wang4, Qingqing Wang1, Haofei Wang5, Haitao Zheng1, Fang Zhang4, Hongrong Shi6, Yuxuan Bian7, Yongxiang Han2, Pingqing Fu1, Francesco Canonaco8, André S. H. Prévôt8, Tong Zhu9, Pucai Wang6, Zhanqing Li4, and Yele Sun1,3,10 1State Key Laboratory of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Physics and Atmospheric Chemistry, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029, China
2Collaborative Innovation Center on Forecast and Evaluation of Meteorological Disasters, Nanjing University of Information Science & Technology, Nanjing 210044, China
3College of Earth Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China
4College of Global Change and Earth System Science, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China
5Key Laboratory of 3D Information Acquisition and Application of Ministry of Education, Capital Normal University, Beijing 100048, China
6Key Laboratory of Middle Atmosphere and Global Environment Observation, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029, China
7State Key Laboratory of Severe Weather, Chinese Academy of Mete orological Sciences, Beijing 100081, China
8Laboratory of Atmospheric Chemis try, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen PSI 5232, Switzerland
9College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China
10Center for Excellence in Regional Atmospheric Environment, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen 361021, China
*These authors contributed equally to this work.
Abstract. The North China Plain (NCP) has experienced frequent severe haze pollution events in recent years. While extensive measurements have been made in megacities, aerosol sources, processes, and particle growth at urban downwind sites remain less understood. Here, an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor and a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer, along with a suite of collocated instruments, were deployed at the downwind site of Xingtai, a highly polluted city in the NCP, for real-time measurements of submicron aerosol (PM1) species and particle number size distributions during May and June 2016. The average mass concentration of PM1 was 30.5 (±19.4) μg m−3, which is significantly lower than that during wintertime. Organic aerosols (OA) constituted the major fraction of PM1 (38 %) followed by sulfate (25 %) and nitrate (14 %). Positive matrix factorization with the Multilinear Engine version 2 showed that oxygenated OA (OOA) was the dominant species in OA throughout the study, on average accounting for 78 % of OA, while traffic and cooking emissions both accounted for 11 % of OA. Our results highlight that aerosol particles at the urban downwind site were highly aged and mainly from secondary formation. However, the diurnal cycle also illustrated the substantial influence of urban emissions on downwind sites, which are characterized by similar pronounced early morning peaks for most aerosol species. New particle formation and growth events were also frequently observed (58 % of the time) on both clean and polluted days. Particle growth rates varying from 1.2 to 4.9 nm h−1 were positively related to the condensation sink during periods with high OOA contributions and also to sulfate concentrations during relatively clean periods. Our results showed that sulfate and OOA played important roles in particle growth during clean periods, while OOA was more important than sulfate during polluted events. Further analyses showed that particle growth rates have no clear dependence on air mass trajectories.
Citation: Zhang, Y., Du, W., Wang, Y., Wang, Q., Wang, H., Zheng, H., Zhang, F., Shi, H., Bian, Y., Han, Y., Fu, P., Canonaco, F., Prévôt, A. S. H., Zhu, T., Wang, P., Li, Z., and Sun, Y.: Aerosol chemistry and particle growth events at an urban downwind site in the North China Plain, Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2017-889, in review, 2018.
Yingjie Zhang et al.
Yingjie Zhang et al.
Yingjie Zhang et al.

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Short summary
We have a comprehensive characterization of aerosol chemistry and particle growth events at a downwind site of a highly polluted city in North China Plain. Aerosol particles at the urban downwind site were highly aged and mainly from secondary formation. New particle growth events were also frequently observed on both clean and polluted days. While both sulfate and SOA played important roles in particle growth during clean periods, SOA was more important than sulfate during polluted events.
We have a comprehensive characterization of aerosol chemistry and particle growth events at a...
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