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Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2017-594
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Research article
06 Jul 2017
Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. A revision of the manuscript is under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).
The influence of local oil exploration, regional wildfires, and long range transport on summer 2015 aerosol over the North Slope of Alaska
Jessie M. Creamean1,2, Maximilian Maahn1,2, Gijs de Boer1,2, Allison McComiskey3, Arthur J. Sedlacek4, and Yan Feng5 1Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, USA
2Physical Sciences Division, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO, USA
3Global Monitoring Division, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO, USA
4Environmental and Climate Sciences, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, USA
5Environment Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL, USA
Abstract. The Arctic is warming at an alarming rate, yet the processes that contribute to enhanced warming are not well understood. Arctic aerosols have been targeted in studies for decades due to their consequential impacts on the energy budget directly and indirectly through their ability to modulate cloud microphysics. Even with the breadth of knowledge afforded from these previous studies, aerosols and their effects remain poorly quantified, especially in the rapidly-changing Arctic. Additionally, many previous studies involved use of ground-based measurements, and due to the frequent stratified nature of the Arctic atmosphere, brings into question the representativeness of these datasets aloft. Here, we report on airborne observations from the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Fifth Airborne Carbon Measurements (ACME-V) campaign along the North Slope of Alaska during the summer of 2015. Contrary to previous evidence that the Alaskan Arctic summertime air is relatively pristine, we show how local oil extraction activities, 2015’s central Alaskan wildfires, and to a lesser extent, long-range transport introduce aerosols and trace gases higher in concentration than previously reported in Arctic haze measurements to the North Slope. Although these sources were either episodic or localized, they serve as abundant aerosol sources that have the potential to impact a larger spatial scale after emission.

Citation: Creamean, J. M., Maahn, M., de Boer, G., McComiskey, A., Sedlacek, A. J., and Feng, Y.: The influence of local oil exploration, regional wildfires, and long range transport on summer 2015 aerosol over the North Slope of Alaska, Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2017-594, in review, 2017.
Jessie M. Creamean et al.
Jessie M. Creamean et al.
Jessie M. Creamean et al.

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We report on airborne observations from the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Fifth Airborne Carbon Measurements (ACME-V) campaign along the North Slope of Alaska during the summer of 2015. We show how local oil extraction activities, 2015's central Alaskan wildfires, and to a lesser extent, long-range transport introduce aerosols and trace gases higher in concentration than previously reported in Arctic haze measurements to the North Slope.
We report on airborne observations from the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation...
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