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Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2017-529
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
03 Jul 2017
Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. A revision of the manuscript is under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).
Nanoparticle Growth by Particle Phase Chemistry
Michael J. Apsokardu and Murray V. Johnston Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, 19716, USA
Abstract. The ability of particle phase chemistry to alter the molecular composition and enhance the growth rate of nanoparticles in the 2–100 nm diameter range is investigated through the use of a growth model. The molecular components included are sulfuric acid, ammonia, water, a non-volatile organic compound and a semi-volatile organic compound. Molecular composition and growth rate are compared for particles that grow by partitioning alone vs. those that grow by a combination of partitioning and an accretion reaction in the particle phase between two organic molecules. Particle phase chemistry causes a change in molecular composition that is particle diameter dependent, and when the reaction involves semi-volatile molecules, the particles grow faster than by partitioning alone. These effects are most pronounced for particle larger than about 20 nm in diameter. The growth rate enhancement increases linearly with increasing particle diameter and is dependent on the gas phase mixing ratio of the semi-volatile reactant and the reaction rate constant. The results are discussed in the context of recent experimental measurements of particle size-dependent molecular composition and the relationship between accretion product formation and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity.

Citation: Apsokardu, M. J. and Johnston, M. V.: Nanoparticle Growth by Particle Phase Chemistry, Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2017-529, in review, 2017.
Michael J. Apsokardu and Murray V. Johnston
Michael J. Apsokardu and Murray V. Johnston
Michael J. Apsokardu and Murray V. Johnston

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Short summary
The ability of particle phase chemistry to alter the molecular composition and enhance the growth rate of nanoparticles is investigated through the use of a growth model. The effects of particle phase chemistry are found to be most pronounced for particles larger than about 20 nm in diameter. The results are discussed in the context of recent experimental measurements of particle size-dependent molecular composition.
The ability of particle phase chemistry to alter the molecular composition and enhance the...
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