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Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2017-471
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
06 Jun 2017
Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).
Three years of measurements of light-absorbing aerosols in the marine air at Henties Bay, Namibia: seasonality, origin, and transport
Paola Formenti1, Stuart Piketh2, Andreas Namwoonde3, Danitza Klopper2, Mathieu Cazaunau1, Anais Feron1, Cecile Gaimoz1, Stephen Broccardo2, Nicola Walton2, Karine Desboeufs1, Guillaume Siour1, Roelof Burger2, Mattheus Hanghome3, Samuel Mafwila3, Edosa Omoregie3, Wolfgang Junkermann4, and Willy Maenhaut5 1LISA, UMR CNRS 7583, Université Paris Est Créteil et Université Paris Diderot, Institut Pierre Simon Laplace, Créteil, France
2School of Geo- and Spatial Science, Unit for Environmental Sciences and Management, North-West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa
3Sam Nujoma Marine and Coastal Resources Research Centre (SANUMARC), University of Namibia, Sam Nujoma Campus, Henties Bay, Namibia
4Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute of Meteorology and Climate Research, IMK-IFU, Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany
5Ghent University (UGent), Department of Analytical Chemistry, Gent, Belgium
Abstract. Continuous measurements between July 2012 and December 2015 at the Henties Bay Aerosol Observatory (HBAO; 22° S, 14°05’ E), Namibia, show that, during the austral wintertime, transport of light-absorbing black carbon aerosols occurs at low-level into the marine boundary layer from the South East Atlantic coast. Daily concentrations reach 986 ng m-3 and display a seasonal maximum from May to August, ahead of the dry season peak of biomass burning in southern Africa (August to October). This outflow is due to either anti-cyclonic circulation or along-the-coast streamlines and contributes to the transport of both biomass and fossil fuel burning aerosols. We estimate that the particle number concentration associated with this transport could contribute up to 2000 cm-3 to the cloud droplet number concentration with respect to pristine conditions. Their direct radiative effect is negligible.

Citation: Formenti, P., Piketh, S., Namwoonde, A., Klopper, D., Cazaunau, M., Feron, A., Gaimoz, C., Broccardo, S., Walton, N., Desboeufs, K., Siour, G., Burger, R., Hanghome, M., Mafwila, S., Omoregie, E., Junkermann, W., and Maenhaut, W.: Three years of measurements of light-absorbing aerosols in the marine air at Henties Bay, Namibia: seasonality, origin, and transport, Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2017-471, in review, 2017.
Paola Formenti et al.
Paola Formenti et al.
Paola Formenti et al.

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Short summary
Three-years of continuous measurements at the Henties Bay Aerosol Observatory (HBAO; 22°S, 14°05’E), Namibia show that during the austral wintertime, long- and medium-range transport of pollution from biomass and fossil fuel burning give raise to peaks of light-absorbing black carbon aerosols into the marine boundary layer that could affect the cloud properties by entrainment.
Three-years of continuous measurements at the Henties Bay Aerosol Observatory (HBAO; 22°S,...
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