Journal cover Journal topic
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2017-432
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
27 Jun 2017
Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. A revision of this manuscript was accepted for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP) and is expected to appear here in due course.
Evaluation of traffic exhaust contributions to ambient carbonaceous submicron particulate matter in an urban roadside environment in Hong Kong
Berto P. Lee1, Peter K. K. Louie2, Connie Luk2, and Chak K. Chan1 1School of Energy and Environment, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China
2Environmental Protection Department, HKSAR Government, Wan Chai, Hong Kong, China
Abstract. Road traffic has significant impacts on local air quality particularly in densely urbanized and populated areas where vehicle emissions are a major local source of ambient particulate matter. Characterization studies on road traffic emissions in Hong Kong are sparse due to the complexity of the urban built environment and the encountered transient engine loads which make emission factor and dispersion modeling approaches difficult to implement. This study provides an estimation of the contribution of vehicles powered by different fuels (gasoline, diesel, LPG) to carbonaceous aerosol based on ambient aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) and elemental carbon (EC) measurements and real traffic data in an urban inner city environment with the aim to gauge the importance of different vehicle types to particulate matter burdens in a typical urban street canyon. On an average per-vehicle basis, contributions of diesel and gasoline vehicles to carbonaceous PM1 were similar, contrary to previous studies which attributed higher particulate matter emissions to diesel vehicles. This clear reduction is likely due to recent control strategies targeted at commercial vehicles and buses. LPG vehicles were found to be a negligible source of elemental carbon and only small contributor to organic particulate mass despite their high abundance in the traffic mix. Gasoline vehicle exhaust contained similar amounts of elemental carbon and organic species, while diesel vehicle exhaust was dominated by elemental carbon.

Citation: Lee, B. P., Louie, P. K. K., Luk, C., and Chan, C. K.: Evaluation of traffic exhaust contributions to ambient carbonaceous submicron particulate matter in an urban roadside environment in Hong Kong, Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2017-432, in review, 2017.
Berto P. Lee et al.
Interactive discussionStatus: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version      Supplement - Supplement
 
RC1: 'Referee comments on acp-2017-432', Anonymous Referee #1, 24 Jul 2017 Printer-friendly Version 
AC1: 'Response to Reviewer 1', Berto Lee, 14 Sep 2017 Printer-friendly Version Supplement 
 
RC2: 'Anonymous Referee', Anonymous Referee #3, 27 Sep 2017 Printer-friendly Version Supplement 
AC2: 'Response to reviewer #2', Berto Lee, 16 Oct 2017 Printer-friendly Version Supplement 
Berto P. Lee et al.
Berto P. Lee et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 456 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)

HTML PDF XML Total Supplement BibTeX EndNote
332 119 5 456 27 2 6

Views and downloads (calculated since 27 Jun 2017)

Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 27 Jun 2017)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 456 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)

Thereof 454 with geography defined and 2 with unknown origin.

Country # Views %
  • 1

Saved

Discussed

Latest update: 11 Dec 2017
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
Road traffic is an important source of air pollution. This study investigates the relationship between traffic-related airborne particles and the composition of traffic to reveal how emissions from different vehicle types affect ambient air quality. On average, LPG vehicles showed very small contributions, while gasoline and diesel powered vehicles emitted similar total amounts of carbon-containing particles, but with differences in chemical composition.
Road traffic is an important source of air pollution. This study investigates the relationship...
Share