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Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2017-40
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
14 Feb 2017
Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. A revision of this manuscript was accepted for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP) and is expected to appear here in due course.
Dominance of climate warming effects on recent drying trends over wet monsoon regions
Chang-Eui Park1,2, Su-Jong Jeong1, Chang-Hoi Ho2, Hoonyoung Park2, Shilong Piao3, Jinwon Kim4, and Song Feng5 1School of Environmental Science and Engineering, South University of Science and Technology of China, Shenzhen, 518055, China
2School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul, 08826, South Korea
3College of Urban and Environmental Sciences, Peking University, Beijing, 100871, China
4Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, 90024, CA, USA
5Department of Geosciences, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, 72701, AR, USA
Abstract. Understanding changes in continental surface dryness is key information for adapting to climate change because of the critical socioeconomic consequences. Recent studies reveal that spatial patterns of continental dryness trends are in contrast to the "dry gets drier, wet gets wetter" paradigm. Causes of the complexity in dryness trends remain uncertain because various climate parameters control continental dryness. Here, we quantify the relative effects of dominant climate drivers on dryness trends over continental East Asia, which is characterized by diverse hydro-climate regimes ranging from humid to arid, by analyzing observed data from 189 weather stations for the period of 1961–2010. Since the early 1980s, monsoon climate zones (east of 100° E) have been getting significantly drier, but the related mechanisms vary according to the hydro-climate regime. Drying trends in arid regions are mostly explained by reduced precipitation. In contrast, in humid areas, the increase in evapotranspiration due to increased atmospheric water-holding capacity, a secondary impact of warming, is the primary condition for the increase in dryness. This drying impact of atmospheric moisture deficiency is much stronger in humid areas than in arid areas. Our results suggest that enhanced atmospheric water demands caused by warming can threaten water resources in wet monsoon areas and possibly in other warm and water-sufficient regions.

Citation: Park, C.-E., Jeong, S.-J., Ho, C.-H., Park, H., Piao, S., Kim, J., and Feng, S.: Dominance of climate warming effects on recent drying trends over wet monsoon regions, Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2017-40, in review, 2017.
Chang-Eui Park et al.
Interactive discussionStatus: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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RC1: 'comments', Anonymous Referee #1, 18 Feb 2017 Printer-friendly Version 
AC1: 'Reply to comments', Su-Jong Jeong, 10 Mar 2017 Printer-friendly Version Supplement 
RC2: 'Review Comments', Anonymous Referee #2, 10 Jul 2017 Printer-friendly Version 
AC2: 'Reply to Review comments', Su-Jong Jeong, 18 Jul 2017 Printer-friendly Version 
Chang-Eui Park et al.
Chang-Eui Park et al.

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Short summary
We find dominant role of warming and related impact, the increase in evapotranspiration due to increased atmospheric water-holding capacity, on surface dryness change in "wet monsoon" (very humid) regions. Our results are contrasting to those of previous studies which usually emphasize changes in precipitation in water-sufficient regions. Our consequence can be applied on other wet climate regimes which are projected to be drier in warmer climate in twenty-first-century.
We find dominant role of warming and related impact, the increase in evapotranspiration due to...
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