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Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2017-390
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
11 May 2017
Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. A revision of this manuscript was accepted for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP) and is expected to appear here in due course.
Impact of agricultural emission reductions on fine particulate matter and public health
Andrea Pozzer1, Alexandra P. Tsimpidi1, Vlassis A. Karydis1, Alexander de Meij2,a, and Jos Lelieveld1,3 1Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Mainz, Germany
2Noveltis, Sustainable Development, Rue du Lac, F-31670 Labege, France
3The Cyprus Institute, Nicosia, Cyprus
anow at: MetClim, Varese, Italy
Abstract. A global chemistry-climate model has been used to study the impacts of pollutants released by agriculture on fine particulate matter (PM2.5), with a focus on Europe, North America and East Asia. Simulations reveal that a relatively strong reduction in PM2.5 levels can be achieved by decreasing agricultural emissions, notably of ammonia (NH3), released from fertilizer use and animal husbandry. The absolute impact on PM2.5 reduction is strongest in East Asia, even for small emission decreases. Conversely, over Europe and North America, aerosol formation is not directly limited by the availability of ammonia. Nevertheless, reduction of NH3 can also substantially decrease PM2.5 concentrations over the latter regions, especially when emissions are abated systematically. Our results document how reduction of agricultural emissions decreases aerosol pH due to the depletion of aerosol ammonium, which affects particle liquid phase and heterogeneous chemistry. Further, it is shown that a 50 % reduction of agricultural emissions could prevent the mortality attributable to air pollution by ~ 250 thousands people per year worldwide, amounting to reductions of 30 %, 19 % and 8 % over North America, Europe and East Asia, respectively. A theoretical 100 % reduction could even reduce the number of deaths globally by about 800 thousand per year.

Citation: Pozzer, A., Tsimpidi, A. P., Karydis, V. A., de Meij, A., and Lelieveld, J.: Impact of agricultural emission reductions on fine particulate matter and public health, Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2017-390, in review, 2017.
Andrea Pozzer et al.
Interactive discussionStatus: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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RC1: 'Review', Anonymous Referee #1, 16 Jul 2017 Printer-friendly Version 
AC1: 'Response to Comments by Reviewer #1', Andrea Pozzer, 15 Aug 2017 Printer-friendly Version 
 
RC2: 'air pollution', Anonymous Referee #2, 18 Jul 2017 Printer-friendly Version 
AC2: 'Response to Comments by Reviewer #2', Andrea Pozzer, 15 Aug 2017 Printer-friendly Version 
Andrea Pozzer et al.
Andrea Pozzer et al.

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Short summary
This study shows that agricultural emissions are important for air quality and their reduction can effectively reduce the concentration of fine particle and the associated premature mortality. The global mortality attributable to fine particle could be effectively reduced by decreasing agricultural emissions. Therefore, emission control policies, especially in North America and Europe, should involve strong ammonia emission decreases to optimally reduce fine particle concentrations.
This study shows that agricultural emissions are important for air quality and their reduction...
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