Journal cover Journal topic
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2017-1223
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Research article
04 Jan 2018
Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).
The efficiency of secondary organic aerosol particles to act as ice nucleating particles at mixed-phase cloud conditions
Wiebke Frey1, Dawei Hu1, James Dorsey1, M. Rami Alfarra1,2, Aki Pajunoja3, Annele Virtanen3, Paul Connolly1, and Gordon McFiggans1 1Centre for Atmospheric Science, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK
2National Centre for Atmospheric Science (NCAS), The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK
3Department of Applied Physics, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland
Abstract. Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) particles have been found to be efficient ice nucleating particles under the cold conditions of (tropical) upper tropospheric cirrus clouds. Whether they also are efficient at initiating freezing at slightly warmer conditions as found in mixed phase clouds remains undetermined. Here, we study the ice nucleating ability of photo-chemically produced SOA particles with the combination of the Manchester Aerosol and Ice Cloud Chambers. Three SOA systems were tested resembling biogenic/anthropogenic particles and particles of different phase state. After the aerosol particles were formed, they were transferred into the cloud chamber where subsequent quasi-adiabatic cloud evacuations were performed. Additionally, the ice forming abilities of ammonium sulfate and kaolinite were investigated as a reference to test the experimental setup.

Clouds were formed in the temperature range of −20 °C to −28.6 °C. Only the reference experiment using dust particles showed evidence of ice nucleation. No ice particles were observed in any other experiment. Thus, we conclude that SOA particles produced under the conditions of the reported experiments are not efficient ice nucleating particles starting at liquid saturation under mixed-phase cloud conditions.


Citation: Frey, W., Hu, D., Dorsey, J., Alfarra, M. R., Pajunoja, A., Virtanen, A., Connolly, P., and McFiggans, G.: The efficiency of secondary organic aerosol particles to act as ice nucleating particles at mixed-phase cloud conditions, Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2017-1223, in review, 2018.
Wiebke Frey et al.
Wiebke Frey et al.
Wiebke Frey et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 231 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)

HTML PDF XML Total Supplement BibTeX EndNote
164 65 2 231 9 0 2

Views and downloads (calculated since 04 Jan 2018)

Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 04 Jan 2018)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 231 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)

Thereof 230 with geography defined and 1 with unknown origin.

Country # Views %
  • 1

Saved

Discussed

Latest update: 16 Jan 2018
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
The coupled system of the Manchester Aerosol Chamber and Manchester Ice Cloud Chamber was used to study the ice forming abilities of secondary organic aerosol particles under mixed-phase cloud conditions. Given the vast abundance of secondary organic particles in the atmosphere, they might present an important contribution to ice nucleating particles. However, we find that in the studied temperature range (−20 to −28 °C) the secondary organic particles do not nucleate ice particles.
The coupled system of the Manchester Aerosol Chamber and Manchester Ice Cloud Chamber was used...
Share