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Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2017-1171
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Research article
12 Feb 2018
Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).
Inverse modelling of CF4 and NF3 emissions in East Asia
Tim Arnold1,2,3, Alistair Manning1, Jooil Kim4, Shanlan Li5, Helen Webster1, David Thomson1, Jens Mühle4, Ray F. Weiss4, Sunyoung Park5,6, and Simon O'Doherty7 1Met Office, Exeter, UK
2National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, Middlesex, UK
3School of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK
4Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92037, USA
5Kyungpook Institute of Oceanography, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 41566, Republic of Korea
6Department of Oceanography, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 41566, Republic of Korea
7School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK
Abstract. Well mixed abundances and decadal trends of carbon tetrafluoride (CF4) and nitrogen trifluoride (NF3) have been well characterised and have provided a time series of global total emissions. Information on locations of emissions contributing to the global total, however, is currently poor. We use a unique set of measurements between 2008 and 2015 from the Gosan station, Jeju Island, South Korea (part of the Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment network), together with an atmospheric transport model to make spatially disaggregated emission estimates of these gases in East Asia. Owing to the poor availability of good prior information for this study our results are strongly constrained by the atmospheric measurements. Notably, we are able to highlight emissions hotspots of NF3 and CF4 in South Korea, owing to the measurement location. We calculate emissions of CF4 to be quite constant between years 2008 and 2015 for both China and South Korea with 2015 emissions calculated at 4.33 ± 2.65 Gg yr−1 and 0.36 ± 0.11 Gg yr−1, respectively. Emission estimates of NF3 from South Korea could be made with relatively small uncertainty at 0.6 ± 0.07 Gg yr−1 in 2015, which equates to ~ 1.6 % of the country's CO2 emissions. We also apply our method to calculate emissions of CHF3 (HFC-23) between 2008 and 2012, for which our results find good agreement with other studies and which helps support our choice in methodology for CF4 and NF3.

Citation: Arnold, T., Manning, A., Kim, J., Li, S., Webster, H., Thomson, D., Mühle, J., Weiss, R. F., Park, S., and O'Doherty, S.: Inverse modelling of CF4 and NF3 emissions in East Asia, Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2017-1171, in review, 2018.
Tim Arnold et al.
Tim Arnold et al.

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Short summary
Emissions of carbon tetrafluoride CF4, NF3 and CHF3 in East Asia have been calculated using atmospheric measurements and an atmospheric transport model. We calculate emissions of CF4 to be quite constant between years 2008 and 2015 for both China and South Korea with 2015 emissions calculated at 4.33 ± 2.65 Gg yr−1 and 0.36 ± 0.11 Gg yr−1, respectively. Emission estimates of NF3 from South Korea could be made with relatively small uncertainty at 0.6 ± 0.07 Gg yr−1 in 2015.
Emissions of carbon tetrafluoride CF4, NF3 and CHF3 in East Asia have been calculated using...
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