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Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2017-1057
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Research article
30 Nov 2017
Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).
Sensitivity of stomatal conductance to soil moisture: implications for tropospheric ozone
Alessandro Anav1, Chiara Proietti1, Laurent Menut2, Stefano Carnicelli3, Alessandra De Marco4, and Elena Paoletti1 1Institute of Sustainable Plant Protection, National Research Council, Sesto Fiorentino, Italy
2Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique, LMD/IPSL, École Polytechnique, Palaiseau, France
3Earth Sciences Department, University of Florence, Florence, Italy
4Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and the Environment (ENEA), C. R. Casaccia, S. Maria di Galeria, Italy
Abstract. Soil moisture and water stress play a pivotal role in regulating stomatal behaviour of plants; however, in the last decade, the role of water availability was often neglected in atmospheric chemistry modelling studies as well as in integrated risk assessments, despite through stomata plants remove a large amount of atmospheric compounds from the lower troposphere.

The main aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of soil water limitation on stomatal conductance and assess the resulting changes in atmospheric chemistry testing various hypotheses of water uptake by plants in the rooting zone; following the main assumption that roots maximize water uptake, i.e. they adsorb water at different soil depths depending on the water availability, we improve the dry deposition scheme within the chemistry transport model CHIMERE.

Results highlight how dry deposition significantly declines when soil moisture is used to regulate the stomatal opening, mainly in the semi-arid environments: in particular, over Europe the amount of ozone removed by dry deposition in one year without considering any soil water limitation to stomatal conductance is about 8.5 Tg O3, while using a dynamic layer that ensures plants to maximize the water uptake from soil, we found a reduction of about 10 % in the amount of ozone removed by dry deposition (~ 7.7 Tg O3). Despite dry deposition occurs from top of canopy to ground level, it affects the concentration of gases remaining into the lower atmosphere with a significant impact on ozone concentration (up to 4 ppb) extending from the surface to the upper troposphere (up to 650 hPa).

Our results shed light on the importance of improving the parameterizations of processes occurring at plant level (i.e. from the soil to the canopy) as they have significant implications on concentration of gases in the lower troposphere.


Citation: Anav, A., Proietti, C., Menut, L., Carnicelli, S., De Marco, A., and Paoletti, E.: Sensitivity of stomatal conductance to soil moisture: implications for tropospheric ozone, Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2017-1057, in review, 2017.
Alessandro Anav et al.
Alessandro Anav et al.
Alessandro Anav et al.

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Short summary
Soil moisture and water stress play a pivotal role in regulating stomatal behaviour of plants; however, the role of water availability is often neglected in atmospheric chemistry modelling studies. We show how dry deposition significantly declines when soil moisture is used to regulate the stomatal opening, mainly in semi-arid environments. Despite dry deposition occurs from top of canopy to ground level, it affects the concentration of gases remaining into the lower atmosphere.
Soil moisture and water stress play a pivotal role in regulating stomatal behaviour of plants;...
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